America's Instrument: The Banjo in the Nineteenth Century

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UNC Press Books, 1999 - Music - 303 pages
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This handsome illustrated history traces the transformation of the banjo from primitive folk instrument to sophisticated musical machine and, in the process, offers a unique view of the music business in nineteenth-century America.

Philip Gura and Jame

 

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America's instrument: the banjo in the nineteenth-century

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Bollman's collecting passion is material on historic banjo manufacture and marketing--he houses over 300 instruments, thousands of photographs, numerous patents, trade catalogs, ads, sheet music ... Read full review

Contents

IV
11
V
75
VI
112
VIII
137
IX
176
X
191
XI
245
XII
255
XIII
259
XIV
293
XV
297
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Page viii - When you want genuine music — music that will come right home to you like a bad quarter, suffuse your system like strychnine whisky, go right through you like Brandreth's pills, ramify your whole constitution like the measles, and break out on your hide like the pin-feather pimples on a picked goose, — when you want all this, just smash your piano, and invoke the glory-beaming...

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About the author (1999)

Philip F. Gura is William S. Newman Distinguished Professor of American Literature and Culture at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is an old-time music enthusiast.

James F. Bollman is co-owner and manager of the Music Emporium in Lexington, Massachusetts. He plays clawhammer banjo and has been collecting and researching banjos and banjo-related ephemera for more than thirty years.

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