American Arbitration: Its History, Functions and Achievements

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Beard Books, 1999 - Law - 280 pages
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This book makes for interesting reading as it traces the two pioneer organizations that consolidated in 1926 to form the American Arbitration Association. The role and influence of the Association in its first twenty years of existence are noteworthy as the book covers the practice of American arbitration and the American concept and organization of international commercial arbitration. The final chapter is devoted to the builders of American arbitration.
 

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Contents

THE HISTORICAL PATTERN
3
THE PATTERN CHANGES IN AMERICA
9
THE AMERICAN ARBITRATION ASSOCIATION ARRIVES
15
THE AMERICAN CONCEPT OF ORGANIZED ARBITRATION
22
THE PROBLEM OF FINANCING ARBITRATION
34
ADVENTURES IN RESEARCH AND EDUCATION
44
TOWARDS A SCIENCE OF ARBITRATION
52
THE GENERAL PRACTICE OF ARBITRATION
63
CANADIANS AND AMERICANS COMPLETE THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE SYSTEM
134
THE UNIFICATION OP LAW AND PRACTICE MAKES PROG RESS IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE
140
THE PROBLEM OF EDUCATION IN INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION
144
AMERICAN ACTION IN INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION
148
AMERICAN VISION OF UNIVERSAL COMMERCIAL ARBI TRATION
157
MEN AND EVENTS
165
TWENTY YEARS OF PROGRESS
167
CHRONOLOGY OF EVENTS
172

LABOR ARBITRATION
83
PRACTICE UNDER THE MOTION PICTURE CONSENT DECREE
92
SPECIAL PRACTICE IN ACCIDENT CLAIMS TRIBUNAL
104
ADMINISTRATORS OF ARBITRATION SYSTEMS
110
THE ARBITRATION CLAUSE AS AN INSTRUMENT
117
AMERICAN CONCEPT
123
BUILDERS OF AMERICAN ARBITRATION
181
ANNEXES
217
COMMERCIAL AND LABOR ARBITRATION RULES
219
ARBITRATION CLAUSES
231
CODE OF ETHICS FOR ARBITRATORS
235
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Frances A. Kellor, 1873-1952, is noted as a famous contributor to the study of mind and society. She was a pioneering sociologist, advocate for workers, advocate for the naturalization of American immigrants, and an eminent authority on arbitration. She earned a law degree from Cornell Law School in 1897. Her studies on worldwide issues of conflict and arbitration made her a recognized authority and author in the field. She was an officer in the American Arbitration Association and prepared the Code of Arbitration in 1931.

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