American Children's Folklore

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Simon J. Bronner
august house, 1988 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 281 pages
1 Review
Concentrating on lore gathered since World War II, Bronner has assembled an anthology of what children really say, not what adults wish they would say. It is through such shared lore songs, expressions, games and beliefs that children adapt to new situations. Bronner includes secret languages, jump rope rhymes, song parodies, games, taunts, tongue twisters, jokes, and more. These treasures make for nostalgic reading for adults who want to relive their own childhoods or gain a window to their own children's world."
 

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Contents

Introduction by W K McNeil
11
Acknowledgments
26
Autograph Album Inscriptions
83
Song Parodies
95
Joy to the World
104
Nonsinging Games
175
Toys and Constructions
199
Notes
237
References
277
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About the author (1988)

Simon J. Bronner Bio:Simon J. Bronner received his Ph.D. in Folklore and American Studies from Indiana University. He became editor of the Encyclopedia of American Studies, then he became editor of the journals Material Culture and Folklore Historian and now edits book series entitled Material Worlds for the University Press of Kentucky and Jewish Cultural Studies. He has edited numerous books: a four-volume encyclopedia of American folk life, a cultural history of consumer society, folklife studies from the Gilded Age, creativity and tradition, the writing of Lafcadio Hearn, the writing of Alan Dundes, American folklore and nationalism, and folk art and material culture. He has been invited all over the country and abroad to speak on his research and consult with American Studies programs, and he won Penn State Harrisburg's awards for research, teaching, and service. Back home he is a highly regarded teacher; he won the Jordan Award for teaching from Penn State in 1985, and the Mary Turpie Prize from the American Studies Association for teaching, advising, and program development. He was visiting distinguished professor of American Studies at the University of California and he served as Fulbright Professor of American Studies at Osaka University in Japan before becoming the Walt Whitman Distinguished Chair at Leiden University in the Netherlands.

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