American Constitutional Law: The Bill of Rights and Subsequent Amendments

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Wadsworth, Dec 1, 2002 - Law - 740 pages
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AMERICAN CONSITITUTIONAL LAW provides a comprehensive account of the nation's defining document. Based on the premise that the study of the Constitution and constitutional law is of fundamental importance to understanding the principles, prospects, and problems of America, the text puts current events in terms of what those who initially drafted and ratified the Constitution sought to accomplish. Each volume examines the interpretations of a variety of sources, including the founding generation, the Supreme Court, lower federal courts and state judiciaries, and extrajudicial materials of constitutional significance (such as congressional acts and resolutions).Volume I focuses on federal rights and powers, and is appropriate for the first semester in the two-semester course sequence in Constitutional Law. Volume II focuses on individuals' rights and responsibilities and is appropriate for the second semester in the two-semester course sequence in Constitutional Law commonly called Civil Rights and Liberties.

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Contents

CONSTITUTIONAL ADJUDICATION
24
CASES
29
How the Supreme Court Decides Cases
32
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Ralph A. Rossum received his doctorate from the University of Chicago. He is Henry Salvatori Professor of Political Philosophy and American Constitutionalism at Claremont McKenna College.

G. Alan Tarr received his doctorate from the University of Chicago. He is a distinguished professor of political science and director of the Center for State Constitutional Studies at Rutgers University, Camden. Professor Tarr has served as a constitutional consultant in Russia, South Africa, Cyprus, and Burma. A three time NEH Fellow, he is currently completing a study of judicial independence and accountability in the American states.

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