American Evangelical Protestantism and European Immigrants, 1800–1924

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McFarland, Jan 19, 2011 - History - 228 pages
3 Reviews
Few topics are as pertinent to the American political scene as immigration. This timely book examines the attitude of American Evangelical Protestants toward European immigration into the United States before the Immigration Act of 1924. Of particular interest are the effects, as seen by evangelicals, that immigration had in the cities, in education, in politics, and in the evangelical quest to win the prohibition of alcohol. It also addresses the rise of the 19th century evangelical’s main ethnic opponent, the Irish immigrant, and the Irish dominance of the American Catholic Church. The text is based largely upon the writings, speeches, and sermons of evangelicalism.
 

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User Review  - Lenow - LibraryThing

Good historical look at 19th century religious undertones regarding immigration. Considering the nation's current immigration questions, such a look at history can be useful. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dvo4253 - LibraryThing

William Phalen's work goes beyond just the relationship between American Evangelical Protestantism and European Immigrants. In American history the Protestant was first on the scene (excluding Native ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
1
Introduction
3
1 The Antebellum Years
17
2 The Cities
34
3 Politics
47
4 The Evangelical Alliance
62
5 The Irish
82
6 Education
98
7 Temperance
113
8 The Social Gospel
128
Conclusion
154
Notes
193
Bibliography
209
Index
217
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About the author (2011)

William J. Phalen holds a Ph.D. in American history from Rutgers University. He lives in Staten Island, New York.

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