American Foundations: Roles and Contributions

Front Cover
Helmut K. Anheier, David C. Hammack
Brookings Institution Press, Sep 1, 2010 - Political Science - 457 pages
0 Reviews

Foundations play an essential part in the philanthropic activity that defines so much of American life. No other nation provides its foundations with so much autonomy and freedom of action as does the United States. Liberated both from the daily discipline of the market and from direct control by government, American foundations understandably attract great attention. As David Hammack and Helmut Anheier note in this volume, "Americans have criticized foundations for... their alleged conservatism, liberalism, elitism, radicalism, devotion to religious tradition, hostility to religion—in short, for commitments to causes whose significance can be measured, in part, by the controversies they provoke. Americans have also criticized foundations for ineffectiveness and even foolishness."

Their size alone conveys some sense of the significance of American foundations, whose assets amounted to over $530 billion in 2008 despite a dramatic decline of almost 22 percent in the previous year. And in 2008 foundation grants totaled over $45 billion. But what roles have foundations actually played over time, and what distinctive roles do they fill today? How have they shaped American society, how much difference do they make? What roles are foundations likely to play in the future?

This comprehensive volume, the product of a three-year project supported by the Aspen Institute's program on the Nonprofit Sector and Philanthropy, provides the most thorough effort ever to assess the impact and significance of the nation's large foundations. In it, leading researchers explore how foundations have shaped—or failed to shape—each of the key fields of foundation work.

American Foundations takes the reader on a wide-ranging tour, evaluating foundation efforts in education, scientific and medical research, health care, social welfare, international relations, arts and culture, religion, and social change.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Their Roles and Contributions to Society
3
Exploring Roles and Contributions
29
Foundations and the Making of Public Education in the United States 18671950
31
Catalysts for Change? Foundations and School Reform 19502005
51
The Partnerships of Foundations and Research Universities
73
Foundations and Higher Education
98
Innovation Marginalization and Relevance since 1900
120
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundations Efforts to Improve Health and Health Care for All Americans
141
The Role of Foundations in American Religion
305
Foundations Social Movements and the Contradictions of Liberal Philanthropy
328
The Consequences of Foundation Funding for Developing Social Movement Infrastructures
347
Conclusion
369
Foundations and Public Policy
371
American Foundations between Continuity and Change
388
Data Sources
403
Cleaning the Foundations Data Set for Chapter 3
405

Foundations and Social Welfare in the Twentieth Century
158
The Case of Welfare Reform
182
The Contribution of American Foundations 19191991
205
US Foundations and International Grant Making 19902002
237
Foundations as Cultural Actors
262
Roles of Foundations and Their Impact in the Arts
283
References
409
Contributors
437
Index
439
Back Cover
458
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Helmut K. Anheier is dean of the Hertie School of Governance, Berlin, academic director of the Center for Social Investment at Heidelberg University, and professor of public policy and social welfare at UCLA. He was previously a Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics, and a researcher at Johns Hopkins University. His publications include Creative Philanthropy, written with Diana Leat (Routledge, 2006) and Nonprofit Organizations (Routledge, 2010).

David C. Hammack is Hiram C. Haydn Professor of History at Case Western Reserve University, where he is also a leader of the Faculty Council of the Mandel Center for Nonprofit Organizations. He is past president of the Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action. His books include Globalization, Philanthropy, and Civil Society, edited with Steven Heydemann (Indiana, 2009) and Making the Nonprofit Sector in the United States (Indiana, 2000).

Bibliographic information