American Government: Brief Version

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Cengage Learning, Jan 1, 2011 - Education - 448 pages
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This popular brief edition text for the one-semester or one-quarter American Government course maintains the framework of Wilson's comprehensive text, emphasizing the historical development of the American political system, who governs, and to what ends. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT, BRIEF VERSION, TENTH EDITION offers new coverage of such key and emerging issues as the 2010 campaigns and elections; leadership of President Obama and the 111th Congress; the economic downturn and new policies to combat the crisis; healthcare reform; recent changes to the Supreme Court; same-sex marriage; and the war in Afghanistan. The text also emphasizes critical thinking skills throughout and includes many tools to help students maximize their study efforts ... and results.
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Contents

What Should We Know About American Government?
1
The Constitution
10
Civil Liberties
35
Civil Rights
60
Federalism
77
Public Opinion and the Media
97
Political Parties and Interest Groups
131
Campaigns and Elections
168
The Bureaucracy
278
The Judiciary
304
Making Domestic Policy
334
Making Foreign and Military Policy
355
How American Government Has Changed
370
Appendix
1
References
38
Glossary
46

Congress
206
The Presidency
242

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About the author (2011)

James Q. Wilson most recently taught at Boston College and Pepperdine University. He was Professor Emeritus of Management and Public Administration at UCLA and was previously Shattuck Professor of Government at Harvard University. He wrote more than a dozen books on the subjects of public policy, bureaucracy, and political philosophy. He was president of the American Political Science Association (APSA), and he is the only political scientist to win three of the four lifetime achievement awards presented by the APSA. He received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award, in 2003. Professor Wilson passed away in March of 2012 after battling cancer. His work helped shape the field of political science in the United States. His many years of service to this textbook remain evident on every page and will continue for many editions to come.

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