American Grasses.--[I-III]

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1900 - Grasses
 

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Page 196 - Gift of the State of New York. 13034, 0. 5. Sixth annual report of the Regents of the University of the State of New York on the condition of the State Cabinet of Natural History, Ac.
Page 185 - Flora of the Southern United States : containing Abridged Descriptions of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of Tennessee, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida: arranged according to the Natural System by AW Chapman, MD The Ferns by Daniel C.
Page 19 - ... glumes) . Opposed to each flowering glume, with its back turned toward the rachilla, is (usually) a two-nerved, two-keeled bract or prophyllum (the palea) , which frequently envelops the flower by its infolded edges. At the base of the flower, between it and its glume, are usually two very small hyaline scales (lodicules) ; rarely there is a third lodicule between the flower and the palea...
Page 54 - Leer'* 0^oMę. representative in Iowa is ricecut grass (Leersia), of which there are three species, and another representative, wild rice (Zizania), but the most important member is the rice (Oryza satk'a), of the Old World, because of its extensive use as a cereal.
Page 18 - ... enveloped by the sheath-like basal portion of the two-ranked and usually linear, parallel-veined leaves. Flowers without any distinct perianth, hermaphrodite or rarely unisexual, solitary or several together, in spikelets...
Page 51 - One-flowered (rarely with a male flower below the perfect terminal one), one to four together, with an ovoid or globular involucre of rigid more or less connate bristles, forming spiny burs or false capsules, these sessile or nearly so in simple terminal spikes or racemes, falling off with the spikelets.
Page 18 - Fibrous-rooted, annual or perennial, herbaceous (rarely woody) plants, with usually hollow, cylindrical (rarely flattened), and jointed stems (culms) whose internodes for more or less of their length are...
Page 19 - ... by its infolded edges. At the base of the flower, between it and its glume, are usually two very small hyaline scales (lodicules) • rarely there is a third lodicule between the flower and the palea; stamens, usually three (rarely two or one, or more than three) with very slender filaments and twocelled, usually versatile anthers; pistil with a one-celled, one-ovuled ovary, and one to three, usually two styles with...
Page 183 - Philadelphia; containing a description of the indigenous and naturalized plants found within a circuit of ten miles around Philadelphia.
Page 26 - Spikeleta in spike-like racemes, two at each joint of the articulate rachis, one sessile and hermaphrodite, one pedicellate, the latter hermaphrodite, staminate, neuter, or reduced to the pedicel alone; glumes usually four, the first and second empty, larger and much firmer in texture than the others, the third usually empty, with a staminate flower in its axil, very rarely awned, the fourth or flowering glume hyaline, usually awned, awn usually twisted or geniculate. This tribe contains about four...