American Grasses: Illustrated Descriptions of the Species :

Front Cover
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Division of Agrostology, 1900 - Grasses
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 198 - G. racemosus Beauv. Agrost. 164. 1812.) NAKED BEARD-GRASS.— A loosely tufted erect or ascending perennial 3-6 dm. (l-2) high, with short and broad leaf-blades and numerous (fifteen to thirty) slender, and widely spreading spikes 10-20 cm. (4'-8') long, spikelet-bearing throughout, irregularly scattered along the common rachis. Sheaths short, glabrous, excepting a villous ring at the summit, crowded at the base of the culm; leaves 2-10 cm. (l'-4') long, 4-12 mm. (2"-6") wide, lanceolate, acute....
Page 31 - Spikelets (a, &) small, ovate, about 2 mm. (1") long, acute; the outer glumes slightly exceeding the flowering glume (d). A portion of the spike is shown at a.— Low ground and moist pastures, abundant near the coast from Virginia to Texas. (Mexico, Central and South America, and West Indies.) April-October. The prostrate creeping stems spread rapidly and soon form a dense carpetlike growth, crowding out all other vegetation. It is regarded as one of the most valuable native pasture grasses of the...
Page 71 - Spikelets (a, 6) 2-3 mm. (1"-H") long, densely and irregularly crowded in three or four rows along one side of the axis; first glume one-fourth to onehalf as long as the third; second and third glumes pubescent or muricate-hispid along the nerves, the second awnless or short-awned, the third awnless or with a long rigid awn.
Page 158 - Spikelets (a) 4mm. (2") long, with white-hairy empty glumes, and glabrous flowering glumes (6) 2 mm. long, the first obtuse and awnless, the second bearing a hooked awn just below the apex. — Introduced into this country from Europe with other grasses and now widely distributed. Nova Scotia to Ontario and Illinois south to North Carolina and Tennessee, also on the Pacific coast, especially in Oregon and Washington. May to August. This grass is not well liked by stock and possesses little nutritive...
Page 245 - Sheaths glabrous, the lower ones short, crowded; leaf-blades Involute 3-6 dm. (l-2) long, 2-4 mm. (l"-2") wide. Spikelets (a) about 6 mm. (3") long, 1 to 3 flowered; empty glumes glabrous, acute; flowering glumes (6) with a ring of hairs at the base, minutely scabrous, twice the length of the empty ones, the midnerve usually excurrent as a short point.— -Sand hills and *' blow-outs," Kansas and Nebraska to Indian Territory, Colorado, and Wyoming. July, August. This species has deeply penetrating...
Page 109 - Spikelets(a,6)about2mm. (1") long; empty glumes nearly equal, very acute, one-half as long as, or nearly equaling the flowering glume; flowering glume (c) pilose below, scabrous above, and terminating in a slender awn 4-12 mm. (2"-6") long. A slender form, with slender, elongated, and few-flowered panicles, the outer glumes nearly equaling the inner one, is var.
Page 79 - Muddy or moist sandy shores and marshes along the coast, South Carolina to Florida and Louisiana, west to Texas. (Widely distributed in tropical America and the Pacific islands.) April to October. St. Augustine grass is common along the Atlantic coast as far north as South Carolina, and is extensively used for lawns in Charleston, Jacksonville, etc. It is propagated by cuttings or sets, and quickly covers the most sandy yards with a dense, carpet-like growth. In Australia it is called Buffalo grass...
Page 227 - Alow,fineloafed, and extensively creeping perennial, rarely more than 1-1.5 dm. (4'-6') high; staminate spikes (I, )/) 2 or 3, approximate; spikelets (c) 4-5 mm. (2"-2J") long, 2 to 3 flowered, the empty glumes 1-nerved, the flowering glumes 3-nerved ; pistillate spikelets (a') ovoid, the outer glume indurated. Similar to Bermuda grass in habit of growth.— Dry prairies and river bottoms, Minnesota and South Dakota (ascends to 1,650 m. (4,950) in Blaek Hills), to Arkansas, southern Texas, and...
Page 31 - Poir.) LOUISIANA or CARPET-GRASS.— A slender, erect, or more frequently prostrate and extensively creeping perennial, rooting at the nodes and sending up numerous leafy or flower-bearing branches 1.5-6 dm.
Page 202 - GRAMA or SIDE OATS.— A densely tufted perennial 3-9 dm. (l-3) high, with numerous (twenty to sixty), usually spreading or reflexed spikes scattered along the common axis, forming a long, somewhat one-sided raceme 20-40 cm.

Bibliographic information