American Indian Painting of the Southwest and Plains Areas

Front Cover
University of New Mexico, 1968 - Indian art - 429 pages
For the Southwestern Indians, painting was a natural part of all the arts and ceremonies through which they expressed their perception of the universe and their sense of identification with nature. It was wholly lacking in individualism, included no portraits, singled out no artists. But the roving life of the Plains Indians produced a more personal art. Their painted hides were records of an individual's exploits intended, not to supplicate or appease unearthly powers, but to gain prestige within the tribe and proclaim invincibility to an enemy. Plains painting served man-to-man relationships, Southwestern painting those of man to nature, man to God. Such characteristics, and the ways they persist in contemporary Indian painting, are documented by the 157 examples Miss Dunn has chosen to illustrate her story. Thirty-three of these pictures, in full color, are here published for the first time.

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Contents

THE EARLIEST ART
2
Basic CONSIDERATIONS
10
THE SOUTHWEST
34
Copyright

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