American Law Enforcement: Does Not Serve Or Protect!

Front Cover
iUniverse, 2004 - Law - 260 pages
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This book describes how policing has forgotten to serve and protect citizens but emphasizes technology and quick response after a crime has been committed. It has astonishingly simple new ideas about how policing could prevent crime as well as enforce laws. These radical but economical changes in policing would not only result in more respect for police by the public but would lower the crime rate by preventing crime in the first place. This seasoned veteran brings his experience to bear in tantalizing clarity as a master wordsmith. He produces a compelling case for changing even the kind of vehicles that police use today.

"Commissioner Johannes Spreen was a police officer extraordinary; a man who helped restructure and develop New York City Police Academy training leading to a college program, a 'West Point' for officers, now John Jay College for Criminal Justice. Johannes Spreen is a man of enthusiasm, indeed a prophet; always ahead of his time and brought his talent to Detroit as Police Commissioner and later Sheriff of Oakland County."
-Rudolph P. Blaum, Retired Captain, New York City Police Department, John Jay College, former president American Education Association.

 

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Contents

The Advantages of Foot Patrol
9
Should Officers Protect People or Enforce Laws?
23
Are Police Safer in Cars or On Foot?
43
My Problems With Detroit Cops
58
Its Hard to Be a Role Model
71
The New York Miracle
79
Unions Are Good and Bad
93
Detroit Riots Were Televised
106
Cop Shows and Technology
136
My British Police Experience
161
Community Policing
177
Mobile Foot Patrols
197
A Different Police OfficerA Different Style
211
Women in Dual Purpose Policing
224
References
237
Copyright

People
121

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Who Killed Detroit?
Johannes F Spreen
No preview available - 2005

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