American Liberty: Patriotic Addresses

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Wm. C. Gage & Sons, 1894 - United States - 216 pages
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Page 109 - WHAT CONSTITUTES A STATE?" An Ode in Imitation of Alcaus WHAT constitutes a State? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound. Thick wall or moated gate ; Not cities proud with spires and turrets crowned ; Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride ; Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No; men, high-minded men...
Page 80 - Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State! Sail on, O UNION, strong and great! Humanity with all its fears, With all the hopes of future years, Is hanging breathless on thy fate...
Page 148 - For it seemed good to the Holy Ghost, and to us, to lay upon you no greater burden than these necessary things, " that ye abstain from meats offered to idols, and from blood, and from things strangled, and from fornication, from which if ye keep yourselves, ye shall do well. Fare ye well.
Page 142 - And ye shall hallow the fiftieth year, and proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof: it shall be a jubilee unto you ; and ye shall return every man unto his possession, and ye shall return every man unto his family.
Page 27 - I am a Christian, in the only sense in which he wished any one to be; sincerely attached to his doctrines, in preference to all others ; ascribing to himself every human excellence ; and believing he never claimed any other.
Page 82 - My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that.
Page 79 - Every year of its duration has teemed with fresh proofs of its utility and its blessings; and although our territory has stretched out wider and wider and our population spread farther and farther, they have not outrun its protection or its benefits. It has been to us all a copious fountain of national, social, and personal happiness.
Page 10 - ... we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained, we must fight ; I repeat it. sir, we must fight ! An appeal to arms, and to the God of Hosts, is all that is left us ! They tell us, sir, that we are weak, unable to cope with so formidable an adversary.
Page 91 - So the multitude goes like the flower or the weed That withers away to let others succeed. So the multitude comes — even those we behold, To repeat every tale that has often been told. For we are the same our fathers have been, We see the same sights our fathers have seen, We drink the same stream, we view the same sun, And run the same course our fathers have run.
Page 141 - Beside the sabbaths of the LORD, and beside your gifts, and beside all your vows, and beside all your freewill offerings, which ye give unto the LORD. 39 Also in the fifteenth day of the seventh month, when ye have gathered in the fruit of the land, ye shall keep a feast unto the LORD seven days: on the first day shall be a sabbath, and on the eighth day shall be a sabbath.

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