American Practical Navigator

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1880
 

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Innhold

Examples in geography
51
ARRANGEMENT OF THE TABLES
52
Questions to exercise the learner in plane sailing
58
A table showing how many miles of meridian distance correspond to a degree Of longi
64
Table of solutions of the various cases of Mercators sailing
66
Construction and use of Mercators chart
87
To find the difference between the true and apparent directions of the wind
97
Gauging
103
To survey a coast in sailing along shore
109
To reduce soundings taken at any time of the tide to low water
115
GULF OF PERSIA 867
118
To find the time of high water by a Nautical Almanac
121
TW P8
127
To adjust a quadrant
129
To measure the angular distance of the sun from the moon
135
Adjustments of a circle of reflection
140
Description and use of a portable transit instrument
145
Tables for correcting the adjustments of a transit instrument
151
To find the distance of the land in order to calculate the dip
155
To calculate the true amplitude
159
GULF OF BOTHNIA 348
163
To find the latitude by a meridian altitude of the sun or a fixed star
166
To find the latitude by the moons meridian altitude
171
To estimate the effects of small errors in the observations
179
Second method
185
To find the latitude by one altitude of the sun having your watch previously regulated
200
To find the latitude by the polar star 20b
208
To find the time at sea by a planets altitude
215
To regulate a chronometer by means of a transit instrument
221
General remarks on the taking of a lunar observation
228
Second method of working a lunar observation
239
Table of corrections for second differences
245
To calculate a stars altitude
251
To allow for the change of rate in a chronometer
257
To correct the dead reckoning
263
aLVIII Third correction in Lyonss improved method
275
Difference of latitude and departure for points 1
1
Proportional parts 87
87
Refraction of the heavenly bodies 88
88
Dip for different heights and distances 85
89
To find the correction and logarithm of a lunar observation when the sun is used 97
97
For finding the third correction of a lunar observation 130
130
For turning degrees and minutes into time and the contrary 131
131
Proportional logarithms 133
133
For finding the latitude by two altitudes of the sun 148
148
Natural sines and cosines 160
160
Log sines tangents c to points and quarter points 169
169
To find the time of the moons passing the meridian 230
230
To find the suns right ascension 237
237
Variation of the suns altitude in one minute from noon 239
239
To reduce the numbers of Table XXXII to other given intervals from noon 243
243
Errors arising from a deviation of the telescope from a plane parallel to the plane of the instrument 244
244
Longitudes and latitudes of the fixed stars 245
245
Reductions of latitude and horizontal parallax 246
246
Aberration of the fixed stars in right ascension and declination 247
247
Nutation in right ascension and declination 248
248
AMERICA ICmera coast
340
ICELAND 848
343
ANAMBAS ISLANDS 865
362
NATUNAS ISLANDS 866
365
APO BANK
369
ARABIA coast of 357
379
Catalogue of the Tables with examples of the uses of those not explained in other
385
Addition and subtraction using the signs as in algebra 305
395
To find the altitude and longitude of the nonagestmal
402
To calculate the longitude of a place from the observed beginning
410
BANCAIsland 864
426
CARIBBEAN SEA 838
434
To find the longitude of a place from the beginning or end of
465
To project an eclipse of the moon 415
478
To find the longitude of a place by the moons passage over
489
Improvement of Napiers rules for the circular parts 431
495
CAROLINE ISLANDS 374
503

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Populære avsnitt

Side 11 - The angle in a semicircle is a right angle ; the angle in a segment greater than a semicircle is less than a right angle ; and the angle in a segment less than a semicircle is greater than a right angle.
Side 15 - In any plane triangle, as the sum of the sides about the vertical angle is to their difference, so is the tangent of half the sum of the angles at the base to the tangent of half their difference.
Side 15 - In any plane triangle, the sum of any two sides is to their difference as the tangent of half the sum of the opposite angles is to the tangent of half their difference. By Theorem II. we have a : b : : sin. A : sin. B.
Side 6 - A plane rectilineal angle is the inclination of two straight lines to one another, which meet together, but are not in the same straight line.
Side 254 - Emersion (Em.) the instant of its reappearance at coming out of the shadow. They generally happen when the Satellite is apparently at some distance from the body of Jupiter, except near the opposition of Jupiter to the Sun, when the eclipse takes place near to the body of the planet.
Side 7 - In a right triangle, the side opposite the right angle is called the hypotenuse, and the other two sides the legs.
Side 233 - ... distance, to obtain the approximate Greenwich mean time corresponding to the given distance. If the distance between the Moon and a Star increased or decreased uniformly, the Greenwich...
Side 126 - ... to the depth of 80 or 100 fathoms ; then heave the log, and the number of knots run out in half a minute will be the miles the current sets per hour, and the bearing of the log will show the set of it. There is a very remarkable current, called the GULF STREAM, which sets in a north-east direction along the coast of America, from Cape Florida towards the Isle of Sables...
Side 148 - ... placed by the maker equidistant from each other and parallel to the middle one — therefore, when the middle one is adjusted, the others are so too ; he also places the two transverse wires at right angles to the vertical middle wire. These adjustments are always performed by the maker, and but little liable to derangement. When, however, they happen to get out of order, and the observer wishes to correct them, it is done by loosening the screws which hold the eye-end of the telescope in its...
Side 136 - ... to make the objects appear on the other wire ; if the contact still remains perfect, the axis of the telescope is in proper adjustment ; if not, it must be altered by moving the two screws which fasten, to the up-and-down piece, the collar into which the telescope screws. This adjustment is not very liable to be deranged.

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