American Ship Models and How to Build Them

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Courier Corporation, Jun 23, 2003 - Crafts & Hobbies - 254 pages
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This classic guide to ship modeling is distinguished by its particular suitability for beginners. Both text and plans are especially geared toward the growing skills of novices, with projects presented in easy-to-learn techniques and arranged in order of difficulty, starting with relatively simple models and culminating in more complicated square-riggers.
The plans are drawn from those of the original builders or from measurements of existing craft, showing all the necessary details for creating highly accurate scale models. Starting with the construction of a half-hull ship model, the book advances to the building of a whole-hull model and replicas of twelve different American sailing vessels, with separate chapters on rigging, gear and furniture, and tools and materials.
Written by an expert model maker, this guide is newly returned to print after many years. Beginners to the craft will find it an essential companion, and even experienced model makers will find it a helpful and informative resource.

 

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This is an appallingly made copy.

Contents

FOREWORD By Howard I Chapelle
13
Chapter Three TWELVE AMERICAN SAILING VESSELS
56
Chapter Four RIGGING
126
Chapter Five GEAR AND FURNITURE
143
APPENDICES
157
RECOMMENDED READINGS FOR SHIPMODEL
165
INDEX
181

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 182 - A lower corner of a square sail, or the after lower corner of a fore-and-aft sail, b A loop and thimbles at the corner of a sail, c pi. A combination of lines by which a hammock is suspended. — t'.
Page 183 - A small line used to fasten the upper corners of a sail to the yard or gaff.
Page 186 - ... leech. The side of a square sail; the after edge of a fore-and-aft sail.
Page 184 - The opening through the bulwarks of a vessel by which persons enter or leave it.
Page 182 - One of the ropes by which the clews of the courses of a square-rigged vessel are hauled up to the lower yards.
Page 183 - A block whose position shifts which a ship sinks. to suit the working of the tackle with which it is connected.

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