American Game Bird Shooting

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Forest and Stream Publishing Company, 1910 - Fowling - 558 pages
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Page 288 - Snow, when hee may follow them by their tracts; some have killed ten or a dozen in halfe a day; if they can be found towards an evening and watched where they peirch, if one come about ten or eleaven of the clocke he may shoote as often as he will, they will sit, unlesse they be slenderly wounded.
Page 233 - Then it is that the proud cock, in order to complete his triumph, will rush forward at his best speed for two or three rods through the midst of the lovesick damsels, pouring out as he goes a booming noise, almost a hoarse roar, only more subdued, which may be heard for at least two miles in the still morning air. This heavy booming sound is by no means harsh or unpleasant; on the contrary, it is soft and even harmonious. When standing in the open prairie at early dawn, listening to hundreds of different...
Page 288 - England, feede them how you can. I had a Salvage who hath taken out his boy in a morning, and they have brought home their loades about noone. I have asked them what number they found in the woods, who have answered Neent Metawna, which is a thousand that day ; the plenty of them is such in those parts. They are easily killed at rooste, because the one being killed, the other sit fast neverthelesse, and this is no bad commodity.
Page 230 - The Prairie Chicken is commonly said to be a resident bird, and so it is in the larger part of its range; but in Iowa a regular but local migration takes place. ... In November and December large flocks of Prairie Chickens come from northern Iowa and southern Minnesota to settle for the winter in northern Missouri and southern Iowa. This migration varies in bulk with the severity of the winter. During an early cold snap immense flocks come from the northern prairies to southern Iowa, while in mild,...
Page 21 - Woodcock (PhUoliela minor) arrived in countless thousands. Prior to their arrival I had seen but two birds the entire winter. They were everywhere and were completely bewildered. Tens of thousands were killed by would-be sportsmen, and thousands were frozen to death. The great majority were so emaciated that they were practically feathers and of course were unable to withstand the cold. One man killed 200 pairs in a few hours.
Page 234 - Every few minutes this display is repeated. I have seen not only one, but more than twenty cocks going through this funny operation at once, but then they seem careful not to run against each other, for they have not yet got to the fighting point. After a little while the lady birds begin to show an interest in the proceedings by moving about quickly a few yards at a time, and then standing still a short time. When...
Page 253 - ... taking the shortest of steps, but stamping its feet so hard and rapidly that the sound is like that of a...
Page 199 - I have sometimes chased them half a mile or more, over the rocky, craggy ridges of the main range, without being able to get within gunshot, or force them to take wing. The flight of the Ptarmigan is strong, rapid, and at times sustained for a considerable distance, though usually they fly but a few hundred yards before alighting again. It resembles that of the Prairie Hen, consisting of rapid flappings of the wings, alternating with the sailing flight of the latter bird. The note is a loud cackle,...
Page 22 - ... entire winter. They were everywhere and were completely bewildered. Tens of thousands were killed by would-be sportsmen, and thousands were frozen to death. The great majority were so emaciated that they were practically feathers and of course were unable to withstand the cold. One man killed 200 pairs in a few hours. I shot a dozen birds. Late Tuesday afternoon I easily caught, several birds on the snow and put them into a thawed spot on the edge of a swift running stream in order that they...
Page 252 - It presents the most amusing spectacle I have yet witnessed in bird life. At first, the birds may be seen standing about in ordinary attitudes, when suddenly one of them lowers its head, spreads out its wings nearly horizontally and its tail perpendicularly, distends its air sacs and erects its feathers, then rushes across the

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