American Homoeopathist, Volume 9

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Chatterton-Peck., 1883 - Homeopathy
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Page 312 - Bring the patient near a good light of any kind, and after the mouth has been opened place on the tongue a depressor, then request the patient to yawn. The larynx will immediately rise up, and every part necessary to be seen will be brought fully into view.
Page 87 - Members of the Medical Society of the State of New York, and of the medical societies in affiliation therewith, may meet in consultation legally qualified practitioners of medicine. Emergencies may occur in which all restrictions should, in the judgment of the practitioner, yield to the demands of humanity.
Page 56 - I believe, in the first place, that in nineteen cases out of twenty in which the diagnosis of " sciatica " is suggested there is no affection of the sciatic nerve whatever. They are simply cases of arthritic disease of the hip in one or other of its various forms — acute gout, chronic gout, rheumatic gout, subacute rheumatism, or chronic senile rheumatism. Both by the public and the profession these cases are constantly called
Page 228 - In fiftyseven out of the sixty, catarrh of the uterus was present. In all these cases only a small number of spermatozoa could be detected within the uterus, and they had all become motionless at the interval of, at the outside, five hours after coitus. In healthy women, on the other hand, the author found that the movements of the spermatozoa within the uterus continued for at least twentysix hours. Thus the important effect of an altered character of the uterine secretion, in its destructive influence...
Page 151 - Man is to himself the mightiest prodigy of nature ; for he is unable to conceive what is body, still less what is mind, but least of all, is he able to conceive how a body can be united to a mind ; yet this is his proper being.
Page 312 - The larynx will immediately rise up, and every part necessary to be seen will be brought fully into view. The nose should be held, as this compels breathing through the mouth. Thus the velum pendulum palati is raised, the anterior and posterior pillars become widened, exposing the back of the tonsils and pharynx. The tongue must be pressed downward very gently s as it always resists harsh treatment.
Page 276 - ... have thought that the origin and proper use of hot water should become history. The practice dates back to 1858, when Dr. James H. Salisbury, of this city, concluded a series of experiments on feeding animals, to ascertain the relation of food as a cause and cure of disease.* * Besides swine, he experimented on men. These he took in companies of six healthy laborers and placed under military discipline, which he enforced himself.
Page 94 - Though we commonly regard mental and bodily life as distinct, it needs only to ascend somewhat above the ordinary point of view, to see that they are but sub-divisions of life in general ; and that no line of demarcation can be drawn between them, otherwise than arbitrarily.
Page 277 - Four times a day gives an amount of hot water sufficient to bring the urine to the right specific gravity, quantity, color, odor and freedom from deposit on cooling. If the patient leaves out one dose of hot water during an astronomical day, the omission will show in the increased specific gravity as indicated by the urinometer, in the color, etc. Should the patient be thirsty between meals, eight ounces of hot water can be taken any time between two hours after a meal and one hour before the next...
Page 277 - The urine should be. devoid of the rank "urinus" smell so well known but indescribable. The Salisbury plans aim for this in all cases, and when the patients are true and faithful the aim is realized. 3. Times of taking hot water. — One hour to two hours before each meal, and half an hour before retiring to bed. At first Dr. Salisbury tried the time of one-half hour before meals, but this was apt to be followed by vomiting.

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