American Sewerage Practice ...

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McGraw-Hill, 1914 - Sewerage
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Page 79 - Fuertes's Water and Public Health i2mo, i 50 Water-filtration Works. i2mo, 2 50 Ganguillet and Kutter's General Formula for the Uniform Flow of Water in Rivers and Other Channels.
Page 218 - The stronger the wind the greater the difference is apt to be. In a high location eddies of wind produced by walls of buildings divert rain that would otherwise fall in the gage. A gage near the edge of the roof, on the windward side of a building, shows less rainfall than one in the center of the roof. The vertical ascending current along the side of the wall extends slightly above the level of the roof, and part of the rain is carried away from the gage. In the center of a large, flat roof, at...
Page 4 - ... away, and how the poor miserable inhabitants live in such places, it is hard to tell. In pursuance of my duties, from time to time I have...
Page 115 - The sewers should have a capacity when flowing half full sufficient to carry twice the future average flow twenty-five years hence, plus a sufficient allowance for ground water infiltration. When grades lower than those given are used, an explanation and reasons for the use of such grades should be included in the engineer's report.
Page 102 - This difficulty was eliminated by the use of a slide-rule constructed for that purpose. " The exponents in the formula used were selected as representing as nearly as possible average conditions, as deduced from the best available records of experiments upon the flow of water in such pipes and channels as most frequently occur in waterworks practice. The last term, 0.001...
Page 28 - ... 7. That town sewage can best and most cheaply be disposed of and purified by the process of land irrigation for agricultural purposes, where local conditions are favorable to its application, but that the chemical value of sewage is greatly reduced to the farmer by the fact that it must be disposed of day by day throughout the entire year, and that its volume is generally greatest when it is of the least service to the land.
Page 34 - ... which cannot properly be passed through the ordinary tanks. As regards the amount which may be properly passed through the ordinary tanks, our experience shows that in storm times the rate of flow through these tanks may usually be increased...
Page 28 - Finally, on the basis of the above conclusions, we further beg leave to express to your Lordships that, in our judgment, the following two principles are established for legislative application : — " First, that wherever rivers are polluted by a discharge of town sewage into them, the towns may reasonably be required to desist from causing that public nuisance. "Second, that where town populations are injured or endangered in health by a retention of cesspool matter among them, the towns may reasonably...
Page 28 - That, as far as we have been able to ascertain, none of the existing modes of treating town sewage by deposition and by chemicals in tanks appear to effect much change beyond the separation of the solids and the clarification of the liquid. That the treatment of sewage in this manner, however...
Page 683 - ... through the agency of automatic valve E. The bells are shown in their lowest position; the supply of compressed air is cut off from the ejector, and the inside of the vessel is open to the atmosphere. The sewage gravitating into the ejector raises the bell C, which in turn actuates the automatic valve E, thereby closing the connection between the inside of the ejector and the atmosphere and opening the connection with the compressed air. The air pressure expels the contents through the bell-mouthed...

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