Americans in Paris: (1921-1931) : Man Ray, Gerald Murphy, Stuart Davis, Alexander Calder

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During the 1920s, when cultural exchange across the Atlantic suddenly became heady and reciprocal, Americans traveling to Paris found their americanisme embraced. The French avant-garde, fueled by tempos and freedoms, loved jazz and the visual elegance of Machine Age aesthetics. The American fascination with technology, which electrified their work, gave new charge to European art. Paris welcomed Gerald Murphy, whose billboard-sized cubist icon dominated the 1924 Salon des Independants and launched a brief but briliant career; Stuart Davis, who explored the continuity between cubist painting, lithography, and jazz at the atelier Desjobert; Man Ray, who abandoned oils to begin "painting with light" in his movies and rayographs; and Alexander Calder whose wire circuses and portraits inspired critics to acknowledge art's inherent playfulness. Americans in Paris documents the work and influence of these four notables of the avant-garde, who startle and delight us even today.

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Contents

Capital o f America
13
The View from Paris
53
La Librairie
73
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (1996)

Elizabeth Hayes Turner is Associate Professor of History at the University of Houston-Downtown. She is currently Visiting Managing Editor of the Journal of Southern History.

Author, artist, literary critic and translator Guy Davenport was born on November 23, 1927 in Anderson, South Carolina. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Duke University in 1948 and was selected as a Rhodes Scholar. He earned a Bachelor of Literature from Merton College, Oxford University in 1950 and a Doctor of Philosophy from Harvard University in 1961. He taught English at several universities from 1951 until his retirement in 1990. He received numerous awards including the O. Henry Award for short stories, the 1981 Morton Douwen Zabel award for fiction from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, and translation awards from PEN and the Academy of American Poets. He died on January 4, 2005 in Lexington, Kentucky.

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