Amherst Alpha Delta Phi: 1837-1887

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Press of Fleming, Brewster & Alley, 1887 - Greek letter societies - 176 pages
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Page 73 - I say, improvement in literary culture and in manly character, and this aim is reasonably justified by the results. It is not accidental that the foremost men in college, as a rule, belong to some of these societies. That each society should seek for its membership the best scholars, the best writers and speakers, the best men of a class, shows well where its strength is thought to lie. A student entering one of these societies finds a healthy stimulus in the repute which his fraternity shall share...
Page 31 - ... lustre of the moral ideal, as represented in the actual of life. Sending messages by lightning, traveling at forty miles to the hour, crossing in a week the ocean which the Mayflower perilously breasted, in our sumptuous vessels, framed of iron, luxurious in appointment, propelled from within, and gay with color as so many swimming summer-gardens — these applauded achievements do not tend of necessity...
Page 109 - As others do, so will I; I renounce, I am sorry for it, my early visions; I must eat the good of the land and let learning and romantic expectations go until a more convenient season;" then dies the man in you; then once more perish the buds of art, and poetry, and science, as they have died already in a thousand thousand men. The hour of that choice is the crisis of your history; and see that you hold yourself fast by the intellect.
Page 35 - Of course an imperfect study of history, however rapid and rudimental, shows how often the individual decision and the restraining or inspiring action of great personalities have furnished the pivots on which multitudinous consequences have turned; how, even after long intervals of time, the effects of such have made themselves evident, in changed conditions and tendencies of peoples ; and so it reminds us, with incessant iteration, of the vital interlocking of every energetic personal life with...
Page 49 - It discloses the silent touch and the sweeping command of Divine forecasts. It reverberates with echoes to superlative designs. I know of no other department of study, outside of the Scriptures, more essentially or profoundly religious. A Christian college may well hold it in honoring esteem, and give it in permanence an eminent place among the studies which it proposes. In our recent country, in our times of rapid and tumultuous change, it seems to me that we specially need this, as the thoughtful...
Page 74 - ... which his fraternity shall share from his successful work. The rivalry of individuals loses much of its narrowness, and almost all of its envy, when the prize which the individual seeks is valued chiefly for its benefit to the fellowship to which he belongs. Doubtless members of these societies often remain narrow-minded and laggard in the race, after all the influence of their society has been expended upon them, but the influence is a broadening and a quickening one notwithstanding. Under its...
Page 25 - ... fire-mist as it rounds into a world, and which show the universe, in the immeasurable coordination of its physical forms under the rule of harmonious laws, a house of beauty for beautiful souls. Not merely a general expansion of thought, and, one may say, of the compass of the mind, comes with this larger study of history. It trains directly, with vigorous force, in fine proportion, each chief intellectual faculty. In this respect it is often misconceived by those who regard it as a pleasant...
Page 48 - It everywhere discloses the silent touch and the sweeping command of Divine forecasts. It reverberates with echoes to superlative designs. I know of no other department of study, outside of the Scriptures, more essentially or profoundly religious. A Christian college may well hold it in honoring esteem, and give it in permanence an eminent place among the studies which it proposes. In our recent country, in our times of rapid and tumultuous change, it seems to me that we specially need this, as the...
Page 27 - CHAPTER research ; and that the historical imagination — which of course does not rank with the creative imagination of the poet, but which is surely akin to that, and perhaps not less capable of giving incitement and beautiful pleasure in common experience — that this has such impulse...
Page 34 - Not only the romance of the world is in history, but influences so high in source and in force as to be even sacred descend through it. Benedictive, sacramental, is its touch upon responsive souls. We become comparatively careless of circumstances; aware of kinship, in whatever heroic element may be in us, with the choice, transcendent spirits; regardless of the criticism, or the snarling scoffs, which here may surround us, if only conscious of a deeper and more complete correspondence with those...

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