Amusements: In the Light of Reason and Scripture

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American tract society, 1880 - Amusements - 162 pages
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Page 63 - But if thy brother be grieved with thy meat, now walkest thou not charitably. Destroy not him with thy meat, for whom Christ died.
Page 161 - Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you, and will be a Father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty.
Page 138 - We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Let every one of us please his neighbour for his good to edification.
Page 136 - When one, that holds communion with the skies, Has filled his urn where these pure waters rise, And once more mingles with us meaner things, 'Tis e'en as if an angel shook his wings ; Immortal fragrance fills the circuit wide, That tells us whence his treasures are supplied.
Page 59 - If any of them that believe not bid you to a feast, and ye be disposed to go ; whatsoever is set before you, eat, asking no question for conscience sake.
Page 152 - Thus saith the Lord of hosts : There shall yet old men and old women dwell in the streets of Jerusalem, and every man with his staff in his hand for very age. And the streets of the city shall be full of boys and girls playing in the streets thereof.
Page 35 - And labours hard to store it well With the sweet food she makes. In works of labour or of skill I would be busy too: For Satan finds some mischief still For idle hands to do. In books, or work, or healthful play Let my first years be past, That I may give for every day Some good account at last.
Page 61 - If meat make my brother to offend, I will eat no meat while the world standeth, lest I make my brother to offend — One believeth that he may eat all things : another, who is weak, eateth herbs.
Page 99 - Whereas true religion and good morals are the only solid foundations of public liberty and happiness : " Resolved, That it be, and it...
Page 102 - I can suggest no other, unless it might be by means of a ' dramatic censor,' whose taste or judgment might however be frequently at fault. If the management of theatres could be denied to speculators and placed in the hands of actors who value their reputation and respect their calling, the stage would at least afford healthy recreation, if not indeed a wholesome stimulus to the exercise of noble sentiments.

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