An Address on the Prospects of Railway Enterprise in Natal

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P. Davis, 1864 - Railroads - 32 pages
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Page 4 - Is then no nook of English ground secure From rash assault ? * Schemes of retirement sown In youth, and 'mid the busy world kept pure As when their earliest flowers of hope were blown, Must perish ; — how can they this blight endure ? And must he too the ruthless change bemoan Who scorns a false utilitarian lure 'Mid his paternal fields at random thrown ? Baffle the threat, bright Scene, from Orresthead Given to the pausing traveller's rapturous glance : Plead for thy peace, thou beautiful romance...
Page 4 - Mid his paternal fields at random thrown? Baffle the threat, bright Scene, from Orrest-Head Given to the pausing traveller's rapturous glance. Plead for thy peace, thou beautiful romance Of nature ; and if human hearts be dead, Speak, passing winds ; ye torrents with your strong And constant voice, protest against the wrong.
Page 4 - We miss the cantering team, the 'winding way, The roadside halt, the post-horn's well-known air, The inns, the gaping towns, and all the landscape fair.
Page 13 - The sum at which he arrived, 21,533 per annum, was, he explained: but a portion of the indirect benefit conferred upon this district by the substitution of a railway for a turnpike road— I say but a portion; for, in the first place, I have made no allowance for the saving of money and time to the passengers on the road; I have not calculated on the increased amount of traffic, which will most assuredly be the result of the introduction of railway communication; neither have I taken the increased...
Page 4 - ... useless. His wisdom and far ken shadowed forth the path which the purse of others consummated ; and, while the projector died steeped to the lips in poverty, the speculators realized great profits. His conversation was of a world which his companions could not comprehend. To appropriate the idea of Mr. Macaulay, there were fools then as there are fools now ; fools who laughed at the railway as they had laughed at the canals ; fools who thought they evinced their wisdom by doubting what they could...
Page 9 - Some houses of business save 500/. a year in carriage. Persons now go from Manchester to Liverpool and back in the same day with great ease. Formerly they were generally obliged to be absent the greater part of two days. More persons now travel on their own business. The...
Page 13 - ... substitution of a railway for a turnpike road — I say but a portion ; for, in the first place, I have made no allowance for the saving of money and time to the passengers on the road ; I have not calculated on the increased amount of traffic, which will most assuredly be the result of the introduction of railway communication ; neither have I taken the increased value given to property into consideration. I have merely taken the present amount of goods...
Page 3 - We should as soon expect the people of Woolwich to be fired off on one of Congreve's rockets as to trust themselves to the mercy of such a machine going at such a rate.
Page 32 - In short, all those brilliant and spirit-stirring effusions which the circumstances of the present times combine to draw forth, and which the press transmits to us with such astonishing celerity, warm from the lips and instinct with the soul of the speaker, would have been entirely lost to posterity, and comparatively little known to ourselves, had it not been for the facilities afforded to their preservation by short-hand.
Page 20 - ... together, so that the fire-boxes are opposite to each other, and the driver stands on a common platform ; when filled and loaded, the two engines weigh 55| tons ; of this weight, the wheels nearest to the fire-box, carry about 7 tons each, and the others, about 5 tons each. In fine weather, the locomotives will carry up about 100 tons, and in the worst weather, never less than 70 tons, at a speed of 15 miles per hour. Miles of passenger trains . . . . 613-30 Do. goods trains 2,283-57 Total ....

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