"An American commoner": the life and times of Richard Parks Bland. A study of the last quarter of the nineteenth century

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William Vincent Byars
E.W. Stephens, 1900 - United States - 404 pages
 

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Page 231 - No; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning.
Page 306 - When public bodies are to be addressed on momentous occasions, when great interests are at stake, and strong passions excited, nothing is valuable, in speech, farther than it is connected with high intellectual and moral endowments.
Page 307 - Affected passion, intense expression, the pomp of declamation, all may aspire after it — they cannot reach it. It comes, if it come at all, like the outbreaking of a fountain from the earth, or the bursting forth of volcanic fires, with spontaneous, original, native force.
Page 323 - ... pyramid, Thy heroes, though the general doom Hath swept the column from their tomb, A mightier monument command, The mountains of their native land ! There points thy Muse to stranger's eye The graves of those that cannot die ! Twere long to tell, and sad to trace, Each step from splendour to disgrace; Enough — no foreign foe could quell Thy soul, till from itself it fell ; Yes ! Self-abasement paved the way To villain-bonds and despot sway.
Page 234 - We are opposed to the issuing of interest-bearing bonds of the United States in time of peace and condemn the trafficking with banking syndicates, which, in exchange for bonds and at an enormous profit to themselves, supply the Federal Treasury with gold to maintain the policy of gold monometallism.
Page 383 - The legal tender acts do not attempt to make paper a standard of value. We do not rest their validity upon the assertion that their emission is coinage, or any regulation of the value of money ; nor do we assert that Congress may make anything which has no value money. What we do assert is, that Congress has power to enact that the government's promises to pay money shall be, for the time being, equivalent in value to the representative of value determined by the coinage acts, or to multiples thereof.
Page 388 - ... shall be exempt from all taxes or duties of the United States, as well as from taxation in any form by or under State, municipal, or local authority...
Page 255 - That war be, and the same is hereby, declared to exist, and that war has existed since the 21st day of April, AD 1898, including said day, between the United States of America and the Kingdom of Spain.
Page 391 - States containing 412 grains each of standard silver; and that to restore to its coinage such silver coins as a legal tender in payment of said bonds, principal and interest, is not in violation of the public faith, nor in derogation of the rights of the public creditor.
Page 307 - The clear conception, outrunning the deductions of logic, — the high purpose, — the firm resolve, — -the dauntless spirit, speaking on the tongue, beaming from the eye, informing every feature, and urging the whole man onward, right onward, to his object, — this, this is eloquence; or, rather, it is something greater and higher than all eloquence, — it is action, noble, sublime, godlike action.

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