An Appealing Act: Why People Appeal in Civil Cases

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Northwestern University Press, 1999 - Law - 197 pages
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What makes people sue? Why do individuals who have lost their cases decide to appeal? In this book, the author offers a comprehensive description of the motives and concerns underlying an individual's decision to appeal in civil litigation. Contrary to most previous research on this topic that argues that people are primarily results-driven, Barclay asserts that people are actually concerned with getting a fair hearing from the court - winning is secondary. The evidence he presents is meticulous but engaging, providing a perspective that explains many behaviours toward the courts, including noncompliance, violence and decisions to self-represent. This book is for anyone interested in the United States judicial system.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
47
CHAPTER THREE
75
CHAPTER FOUR
113
CHAPTER FIVE
141
CHAPTER
155
Works Cited
171
Index
189
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About the author (1999)

Scott Barclay is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Albany, SUNY and author of "An Appealing Act".

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