An Atlas of Drosophila Genes: Sequences and Molecular Features

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Oxford University Press, Jun 24, 1993 - Science - 432 pages
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Drosophila, the common fruit fly, is the most extensively studied of all organisms from the standpoint of genetics and cytology. This atlas summarizes what is known about the approximately 100 Drosophila genes for which the complete nucleotide sequence is known. Each entry includes a description of the gene's molecular organization and expression, the complete nucleotide and amino acid sequences, maps of interesting structures, highlights of functional features and promoter regulatory regions, and selected references to the primary literature. A separate section of the atlas considers different aspects of gene organization as they occur in the Drosophila genome. Topics covered include size correlations among various genetic elements, splicing signals, translation initiation signals, and codon bias. The work represents a new milestone in summarizing current information and making it easily accessible to geneticists and biologists.
 

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Contents

II
317
Appendix
398

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Page 377 - Kozak, M. (1986). Point mutations define a sequence flanking the AUG initiator codon that modulates translation by eukaryotic ribosomes. Cell 44:283-292.
Page 377 - OH, SK, Scott, MP, and Sarnow, P. (1992) Homeotic gene Antennapedia mRNA contains 5'-noncoding sequences that confer translational initiation by internal ribosome binding. Genes Dev 6, 1643-1653.

References to this book

Methods in Aging Research
Byung Pal Yu
No preview available - 1998

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