What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

About the author (2008)

Debra Forthman, Ph.D., is an Animal Behavior Society Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and former director of Field Conservation at Zoo Atlanta. She is President of Animal Behavior Consulting Services, Inc. and a Senior Research Fellow at Georgia Institute of Technology?s Center for Conservation and Behavior. She received her doctorate in psychology from UCLA and is the author of numerous articles and book chapters addressing theoretical and applied animal behavior.

Lisa Kane, JD, a practicing attorney, began her legal career as counsel to the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, specializing in animal health and meat inspection issues. She has written, traveled and spoken on elephant issues since 2002. She presently serves on a panel of elephant welfare experts advising University of Bristol researchers charged with investigating zoo elephant welfare in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

Joyce Poole is Director of ElephantVoices and is on the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Amboseli Trust for Elephants. She has studied African elephants since 1975, working primarily in Kenya?s Amboseli National Park. Her research work has focused on elephant reproductive and social behavior with special emphasis on communication. Throughout her career Joyce has actively engaged in issues affecting the welfare and conservation of elephants.

Petter K. Granli co-directs ElephantVoices, an elephant communication research and web-based educational project collaborating with the Amboseli Trust for Elephants. Petter has a background in management and communication.

Phyllis Lee has a Chair in Psychology at the University of Stirling, having been for many years a Reader at the University of Cambridge, UK. She has been carrying out field research on animal behaviour since 1975, and has been part of the Amboseli Elephant Research project since 1982. She has collaborated with a number of researchers working on forest elephants, and primates from around the world. She is the author of one book, four edited volumes, more than 35 primary journal publications and more than 30 chapters in edited volumes. She works with conservation attitudes and community conservation projects, as well as human-wildlife interactions.

Cynthia Moss has been the Director of the Amboseli Elephant Research Project, which she founded, since 1972. She gained her first elephant experience with Iain Douglas-Hamilton in 1968, and she now conducts research on the distribution, demography, population dynamics, social organization and behaviour of the Amboseli elephants. She supervises research and monitoring as well as training elephant researchers from African elephant range states. She is responsible for outreach to the Maasai community, carrying out surveys and training courses at other elephant study sites in Africa, disseminating scientific results, advocating for elephant welfare and promoting public awareness by writing popular articles and books, and making films about elephants. She was awarded a John D.

A. Christy Williams is a large-mammal biologist who conducted his Ph.D. from the Wildlife Institute of India on ?Elephants and their habitats in Rajaji National Park.? He has continued to study the population parameters of this elephant population since he began the study in 1996. Currently he coordinates the WWF Asian Elephant and Rhino Conservation program that is being implemented in eight Asian countries. He is also involved in active research in Borneo, Malaysia and Sumatra, Indonesia, where he is helping range-country biologists study elephants using GPS-equipped satellite collars.

ay A. Bradshaw is the founder and director of The Kerulos Center (http://www.kerulos.org ), co-founder of IAATR (International Association for Animal Trauma and Recovery; http://www.iaatr.org ) and author of Elephant Breakdown (Yale University Press: 2008). She holds doctorate degrees in psychology and ecology and is on the faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute and Oregon State University. Her research and publications, which focus on psychological trauma and recovery in elephants, parrots and chimpanzees, have led to the establishment of the new field of trans-species psychology.

Gretchen Kaufman is an Assistant Professor of Veterinary Medicine in the Department of Environmental and Population Health and Director of the Tufts Center for Conservation Medicine. She graduated from Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine and completed a residency in zoological medicine at the University of California, Davis. She went back to Tufts to create and run the Exotic Animal Medicine Service in the small animal teaching hospital. After six years she returned to the Tufts Wildlife Clinic where she has continued clinical teaching, clinical and international research and didactic teaching in zoo, wildlife and exotic companion animal medicine. Dr. Kaufman focuses on wildlife medicine curriculum development in the veterinary program, spearheading graduate programs in conservation medicine and coordinating environmental education at the Tufts Institute for the Environment. She conducts veterinary medical research and service projects in Nepal, primarily on rabies prevention/control and the dynamics of tuberculosis among humans, domestic animals and wildlife (including elephants). Dr. Kaufman also chairs the ?Greening the Grafton Campus? Committee, working with other members of the campus community to reduce the environmental footprint of all aspects of the veterinary school?s activities.

Janet Martin obtained her DVM degree from the Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine in 1990. After completing two internships, one in Small Animal Surgery and one in Wildlife and Zoo Medicine, she joined the staff of Roger Williams Park Zoo as the Associate Veterinarian. In 1997 after a six-month sabbatical at the Royal Melbourne Zoo in Australia, she returned to Roger Williams Park Zoo as the Director of Veterinary Services. Dr. Martin acts as the veterinary advisor to both the Monotreme and Marsupial Taxon Advisory Group of the American Association of Zoos and Aquariums, and the Tree Kangaroo Conservation Project, and in 1999 and 2003 accompanied the TKCP field research team to Papua New Guinea. Dr. Martin is currently a Research Assistant Professor at Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine working on infectious disease in wildlife.

Susan Mikota, DVM, has been actively engaged in elephant care, research and conservation for 15 years. Dr. Mikota is a co-founder of Elephant Care International (http://www.elephantcare.org ) and the Director of Veterinary Programs and Research. She is an invited member of the Asian Elephant Specialist Group (IUCN), an author and co-editor of Biology, Medicine, and Surgery of Elephants (Blackwell 2006) and a co-author of Medical Management of the Elephant (Indira Publishing 1994). Dr. Mikota is a consulting veterinarian at the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee.

Peter Stroud worked in major Australian zoos for 23 years, as a keeper, curator and director. From 1993 to 2003 he was active in the development of zoo elephant management in the Australasian region. He now works as an independent consultant. He is a member of the Asian Elephant Specialist Group of the IUCN Species Survival Commission.

Dr. Joseph Barber received his Ph.D. from the University of Oxford, focusing on animal welfare in farm animals. After a joint post-doc at the University of Central Florida and Disney?s Animal Kingdom, as the Enrichment Research Fellow, Joseph took on the role of facilitator of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums? (AZA) Standardized Guidelines project (now ?Animal Care Manuals?), assisting in the development of animal care guidelines and recommendations for all bird and mammal groups within AZA animal collections. Joseph is an active member of the AZA Animal Welfare Committee and remains committed to making animal welfare a priority through his consulting work and graduate teaching.

Dr. Terry L. Maple is Elizabeth Smithgall Watts Professor of Conservation and Behavior and Professor of Psychology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. During the past three years he has worked as President and CEO of the Palm Beach Zoo on academic leave. His previous executive experience includes 17 years as President/CEO of Zoo Atlanta and one year on the staff of the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans. Dr. Maple is also the founding editor of Zoo Biology, and one of the founding members of the American Society of Primatologists. His books include Captivity and Behavior (1979), Orangutan Behavior (1980), Gorilla Behavior (1982), Zoo Man (1993), Ethics on the Ark (1995) and Saving the Giant Panda (2000). He is an elected Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association of Psychological Science, and a former President of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.

Dr. Mollie Bloomsmith is the Head of Behavioral Management at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center where she supervises the enrichment, socialization and animal training programs. She is also the Associate Director of the Center for Conservation and Behavior at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Bloomsmith conducts research to evaluate behavioral management and its impact on animal welfare in laboratories and in zoos, studying a wide variety of species.

Allison L. Martin is a graduate student in the School of Psychology?s Center for Conservation and Behavior at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Ms. Martin received a BS in psychology from Kennesaw State University. She is a current recipient of the Nelly and Geoffory Bourne Fellowship. Her research interests include applied behavior analysis and behavioral management in a variety of species.

Professor Georgia Mason is Canada Research Chair in Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph, and Visiting Professor in Animal Welfare Physiology at the Royal Veterinary College (London). She obtained her undergraduate degree in zoology and Ph.D. in animal behavior from Cambridge University, before taking up a Clare College Junior Research Fellowship. She then held a ?demonstratorship? (assistant professorship) in Vertebrate Biology at Oxford University?s Zoology Department, followed by a BBSRC David Phillips Research Fellowship. She moved to Canada in 2004. Her research interests focus on animal welfare: its objective assessment, and how early experience and species differences protect or predispose animals to problems.

Jake Veasey is the Head of the Department of Animal Management and Conservation at Woburn Safari Park. He studied at the universities of London, Edinburgh and Glasgow, gaining degrees in zoology, applied animal behavior and animal welfare, and a Ph.D. in behavioral ecology respectively. Jake has worked alongside elephants in Zimbabwe, Kenya, Swaziland and South Africa, and is currently responsible for the management of a group of Asian elephants within Woburn Safari Park. He has championed the development of management guidelines for elephants within the UK and beyond in which elephant welfare is fundamental, and management is subsequently based around the biology of the species as well as the needs of the individuals.

Colleen Kinzley is the General Curator of the Oakland Zoo. She has been caring for captive elephants since 1983. Colleen initiated and maintains applied behavioral research on one male and three female captive African elephants. She participates in field research on African elephants in Namibia that examines the social behavior of bull elephant society. Through operant conditioning training, she has trained a captive elephant to participate in forced choice testing to determine seismic detection levels. Colleen also has participated in other research projects, including evaluation of temporal gland secretions, monitoring testosterone in an adult bull and testing efficacy of ibuprofen and phenylbutazone medications in elephants. She implemented a Protected Contact Training and Management program for one male and three female African elephants in 1991, hand-raised an African elephant bull calf and expressed milk from an African elephant cow for ongoing analysis of milk. Colleen coordinates fundraisers and events to provide financial support to and recognition of several elephant research and conservation projects, including over $180,000 to date raised for the Amboseli Elephant Research Project.

Colleen Kinzley is the General Curator of the Oakland Zoo. She has been caring for captive elephants since 1983. Colleen initiated and maintains applied behavioral research on one male and three female captive African elephants. She participates in field research on African elephants in Namibia that examines the social behavior of bull elephant society. Through operant conditioning training, she has trained a captive elephant to participate in forced choice testing to determine seismic detection levels. Colleen also has participated in other research projects, including evaluation of temporal gland secretions, monitoring testosterone in an adult bull and testing efficacy of ibuprofen and phenylbutazone medications in elephants. She implemented a Protected Contact Training and Management program for one male and three female African elephants in 1991, hand-raised an African elephant bull calf and expressed milk from an African elephant cow for ongoing analysis of milk. Colleen coordinates fundraisers and events to provide financial support to and recognition of several elephant research and conservation projects, including over $180,000 to date raised for the Amboseli Elephant Research Project.

Gail Laule received her masters degree in behavioral science from California State University, Dominguez Hills. She and Tim Desmond founded Active Environments to develop techniques to enhance the care and welfare of captive animals. For the past 15 years, Gail has created behavioral management programs for zoos, biomedical facilities and sanctuaries. She is also president of the non-profit organization, Wildlife in Need, currently engaged in conservation and animal welfare projects in the Philippines.

Carol Buckley has over 30 years of experience in the care and management of Asian and African elephants. In 1995, Carol co-founded The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, the nation?s first natural-habitat refuge for sick, old and needy endangered Asian and African elephants. Carol and her staff have built an organization that has rescued 23 elephants and has over 73,000 members. Carol was honored for her innovative work by the 2001 Genesis Awards and as A Hero For The Planet by TIME magazine. She has been the subject of recent features in The Chicago Tribune, People, The New York Times Magazine, and CNN, and has authored two children?s books on elephants. Carol attended the Exotic Animal Training and Management Program at Moorpark College in California, and is licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. She is a well-known speaker on the subject of elephant care.

Bibliographic information