An Elusive Science: The Troubling History of Education Research

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University of Chicago Press, May 15, 2002 - Education - 302 pages
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Since its beginnings at the start of the 20th century, educational scholarship has been a marginal field, criticized by public policy makers and relegated to the fringes of academe. An Elusive Science explains why, providing a critical history of the traditions, conflicts, and institutions that have shaped the study of education over the past century.

"[C]andid and incisive. . . . A stark yet enlightening look at American education."—Library Journal

"[A]n account of the search, over the past hundred or so years, to try and discover how educational research might provide reliable prescriptions for the improvement of education. Through extensive use of contemporary reference material, [Lagemann] shows that the search for ways of producing high-quality research has been, in effect, a search for secure disciplinary foundations."—Dylan William, Times Higher Education Supplement
 

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An elusive science: the troubling history of education research

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Lagemann, who is chair of humanities and the social sciences at New York University and president of the National Academy of Education, has a long history in the field of higher education. In this ... Read full review

Contents

V
23
VI
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VII
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VIII
32
IX
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X
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XI
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XII
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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XLIII
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XLIV
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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L
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LI
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LII
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LIII
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LIV
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LV
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LVI
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LVIII
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LIX
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LX
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LXI
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LXII
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LXIII
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LXV
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LXVI
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Page 5 - ... the instruction of persons, both male and female, in the art of teaching and in all the various branches that pertain to a good common school education; also, to give instruction in the mechanic arts, and in the arts of husbandry and agricultural chemistry, in the fundamental laws of the United States, and in what regards the rights and duties of citizens.
Page 5 - That a state normal school be established the exclusive purposes of which shall be the instruction of persons, both male and female, in the art of teaching and in all the various branches that pertain to a good common school education...

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About the author (2002)

Ellen Condliffe Lagemann is the president of the Spencer Foundation and a professor of history and education at New York University.

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