An Enemy of the People

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Samuel French, Inc., 2001 - Cities and towns - 122 pages
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"The strongest man in the world is the one who stands most alone." The plot of Ibsen's play is relevant more than 125 years after its 1882 publication. Natural springs found in a little Norwegian village are about to put the town on the map until a physician outs a powerful area business that is poisoning the water. Unfortunately, the media is complicit with local government in suppressing the study and when the scientist himself offers to lecture no one will rent him a forum. In short, when the scientist bucks local interests he becomes a pariah to the lightly-educated and easily-manipulated majority in the town, "an enemy of the people." Handier than the free PDFs on the web, this you can hold, bookmark, highlight and shelve. An inexpensive imperative for any history-, economics-, or political- buff.
 

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An enemy of the people is arguably one of the greatest plays ever written in history. In a very significant way it addresses political and socio economic issues pertinent in third world countries. The main protagonist in the play, thomas stands up for the truth no matter the price he has to pay. He is exposed to slander intimidation and some sort of violence. The masses for which he fights are made to turn against him by political leaders who are out to protect their posts and moral influence in the town. He however stands firm in the end proclaiming that the strongest man in the world is he who stands alone. The press symbolised by the peoples messenger is a part of the political malfunctional system and the deceitful gang. It shows that at times in our political history, people should stand for right yet unpopular values. 

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
29
Section 3
53
Section 4
77
Section 5
101
Section 6
128
Copyright

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References to this book

The Crowd
Gustave Le Bon
Limited preview - 1994
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About the author (2001)

Henrik Ibsen, poet and playwright was born in Skein, Norway, in 1828. His creative work spanned 50 years, from 1849-1899, and included 25 plays and numerous poems. During his middle, romantic period (1840-1875), Ibsen wrote two important dramatic poems, Brand and Peer Gynt, while the period from 1875-1899 saw the creation of 11 realistic plays with contemporary settings, the most famous of which are A Doll's House, Ghosts, Hedda Gabler, and The Wild Duck. Henrik Ibsen died in Christiania (now Oslo), Norway in 1906.

Born on January 26, 1946 in Fayal in the Azores, Christopher Hampton graduated from New College, Oxford, with a Modern Languages degree in 1968. After a stint as the resident dramatist at the Royal Court from 1968 to 1970, Hampton began a career as a playwright, soon becoming interested in screenwriting, directing, and producing. As a playwright, Hampton wrote more than a dozen tales including When Did You Last See My Mother?, Tales from Hollywood, Les Liaisons Dangereuses, and Alice's Adventures Under Ground. In 1988, Hampton decided to take his hit play Les Liaisons Dangereuses to the big screen. The resulting movie, Dangerous Liaisons, which Hampton also co-produced, featured Michelle Pfeiffer and John Malkovich in leading roles. Hampton has also written the screenplays for the movies A Doll's House, a story based on Henrik Ibsen's popular play, The Secret Agent and Carrington, both of which Hampton also directed, and Mary Reilly, which starred Julia Roberts. Christopher Hampton has received numerous honors including the Laurence Olivier Award for Les Liaisons Dangereuses in 1986, an Academy Award and Writers' Guild award in 1988 for Dangerous Liaisons, and a Tony award in 1995 for Best Score and Best Book of a Musical for Sunset Boulevard.

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