An English and Welch Vocabulary: Or, An Easy Guide to the Antient British Language ... To which is Prefixed, A Grammar of the Welch Language by Thomas Richards

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W. Williams, 1804 - Welsh language - 189 pages
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Page 11 - Antepennltima, 8tc. as U In the English, Turn, Hunt, Further, Sturdy; or as i, in Bird, Third : In the Ultima or Monosyllables, as i in the English, Tin, Thin, Skin, Trim, (except these Monosyllables, Y, ydd, ym, yn, yr, ys, fy, dy, myn ; which sound Y, as in the Penultima); and if circumflexed, as ee, in the Engi.
Page 10 - Of what parts does the palate consist? ate, and a posterior, /, containing no bone, and called the soft palate. The two can readily be distinguished by applying the tip of the tongue to the roof of the mouth and drawing it backwards. The hard palate forms the partition between the mouth and nose.
Page 15 - Singulars in three Manner of Ways. First, By adding only a Letter or Syllable to the Termination of the Singular. Secondly, By changing only the Vowels or Diphthongs of Monosyllables into other Vowels or .Diphthongs of both the Ultima and Pen ultima of Polysyllables, into other Vowels or .Diphthongs.
Page 94 - PreterperfectTense, and the Emphasis be in the Verb, the Answer is made, if Affirmative, by do ; if .Negative, by Na ddo...
Page 12 - Wales ; as ci mham, her mother ; ei nhai, her nephew. This variation of the initial letters is always regular, and constantly betwixt letters of the same organ of pronunciation ; for a labial letter is never changed to a dental, nor a dental, to a labial, &c. • Adverbs, being formed of adjectives, become such...
Page 27 - II. By either changing the Singular Vowel, with an addition; or by adding another Vowel to the ultimate Vowel of the Singular, and without an addition. Of...
Page 11 - OF INITIAL LETTERS IN WELSH. Such words as begin with mutable consonants, viz. b. c, d, g, 11, m,p, r, and t, in their primary use, change these their radical initial letters, as occasion shall require, and according to the efjedl, VvViiili the Words' preceding have on them, as follows.
Page 82 - Uoth substantives being common, and not pertaining either to manufacture or material whereof a thing is done, or to be done, the latter is immediately subjoined to the former, without any change of its initial : as, 1cariad •mam; 'liaeiioni "tad; 1gweinidog "Duw; 'pen 2bryn.
Page 92 - Na chynnyg wneuthur cam a neb. But if some other word or words come between the Infinitive Mood and the...
Page 28 - Cardinals have no plural, when put in apposition or in composition with their substantives, though their substantives, at the same time, may be either singulars or plurals; as, tri gwr, tri wyr.

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