An Episode of Jewish Romanticism: Franz Rosenzweig's The Star of Redemption

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SUNY Press, Sep 2, 1999 - Literary Criticism - 306 pages
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Examining romanticism in the thought of Jewish philosopher, Franz Rosenzweig, this book compares his magnum opus, The Star of Redemption, with Leo Baeck’s essay, “Romantic Religion,” and Friedrich Schelling’s Philosophy of Art, texts representing two distinct and, to a large extent, opposed interpretations of romanticism.

Rosenzweig’s thought was shaped by two intellectual histories: Germany’s and Judaism’s. Because romanticism had such a definite impact on modern German writing and thought, it becomes a question whether, and to what extent, Rosenzweig, too, was a romantic. Part of the force of the question derives from the tensions sometimes noted between Jewish and romantic worldviews. In this book, author Ernest Rubinstein shows The Star of Redemption to be along the spectrum of ideas that extends between Baeck and Schelling, and thus illustrates a qualified romanticism.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
A Reading of The Star of Redemption through
29
A Reading of The Philosophy of Art against
121
A Reading of The Star of Redemption through
177
Conclusions
265
Notes
271
Index
295
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About the author (1999)

Ernest Rubinstein is Librarian at the Ecumenical Library, The Interchurch Center, New York City and is Instructor at New York University's School of Continuing Education.

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