An Introduction to Catastrophe Theory

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 30, 1980 - Mathematics - 144 pages
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Almost every scientist has heard of catastrophe theory and knows that there has been a considerable amount of controversy surrounding it. Yet comparatively few know anything more about it than they may have read in an article written for the general public. The aim of this book is to make it possible for anyone with a comparatively modest background in mathematics - no more than is usually included in a first year university course for students not specialising in the subject - to understand the theory well enough to follow the arguments in papers in which it is used and, if the occasion arises, to use it. Over half the book is devoted to applications, partly because it is not possible yet for the mathematician applying catastrophe theory to separate the analysis from the original problem. Most of these examples are drawn from the biological sciences, partly because they are more easily understandable and partly because they give a better illustration of the distinctive nature of catastrophe theory. This controversial and intriguing book will find applications as a text and guide to theoretical biologists, and scientists generally who wish to learn more of a novel theory.
 

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Contents

II
1
III
2
IV
3
V
13
VI
17
VIII
21
IX
26
X
30
XXVI
83
XXVII
84
XXVIII
86
XXIX
88
XXX
89
XXXI
93
XXXII
96
XXXIII
98

XI
32
XII
35
XIII
38
XIV
41
XVI
42
XVII
44
XVIII
47
XIX
49
XX
52
XXI
60
XXII
61
XXIV
65
XXV
72
XXXV
106
XXXVI
115
XXXVII
118
XXXVIII
122
XXXIX
127
XLI
129
XLII
134
XLIII
137
XLIV
138
XLV
141
XLVI
142
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