An Introduction to Hegel's Philosophy of Religion

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SUNY Press, Jun 30, 1984 - Religion - 388 pages
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For Hegel, thought is not philosophical if it is not also religious. Both religion and philosophy have a common object and share the same content, for both are concerned with the inherent unity of all things. Hegel’s doctrine of God provides the means for understanding this fundamental relationship. Although Hegel stated that God is absolute Spirit and Christianity is the absolute religion, the compatibility of Hegel’s doctrine of God with Christian theology has been a matter of continuing and closely argued debate. Williamson’s book provides a significant contribution to this ongoing discussion through a systematic study of Hegel’s concept of God.

The book proceeds by investigating theism, atheism, pantheism, and panentheism as descriptions of Hegel’s concept. It rejects the view that Hegel’s doctrine so differs from Christian theology so as to be empty of religious content and thereby highlights some important considerations in contemporary theology.
 

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Contents

VI
11
VII
19
VIII
23
IX
25
X
30
XI
39
XII
42
XIII
48
XXXI
139
XXXII
140
XXXIII
152
XXXIV
157
XXXV
158
XXXVI
159
XXXVII
178
XXXVIII
188

XIV
61
XV
67
XVI
73
XVII
77
XVIII
83
XIX
87
XX
89
XXI
97
XXII
100
XXIII
110
XXIV
112
XXV
117
XXVI
121
XXVII
125
XXVIII
128
XXIX
130
XXX
137
XXXIX
193
XL
195
XLI
203
XLII
216
XLIII
231
XLIV
233
XLV
234
XLVI
251
XLVII
253
XLVIII
255
XLIX
262
L
265
LII
295
LIII
305
LIV
311
LV
377
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