An Introduction to Historical Linguistics

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OUP USA, Mar 4, 2010 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 376 pages
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All languages change, just as other aspects of human society are constantly changing. This book is an introduction to the concepts and techniques of diachronic linguistics, the study of language change over time. It covers all themajor areas of historical linguistics, presenting concepts in a clear and concise way. Examples are given from a wide range of languages, with special emphasis on the languages of Australia and the Pacific. While the needs of undergraduate students of linguistics have been kept firmly in mind, the book will also be of interest to the general reader seeking to understand langauge and language change. For this fourth edition, a number of new sections have been written, including many new problems and several datasets. Existing materials have been supplemented with new sections on grammaticalization, tonogenesis, morphological change, and using statistical methods in language classification.
 

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Review: An Introduction to Historical Linguistics, 4th Edition

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I have read the two editions for the same textbook (ie, 3rd and 4th). However, I will review the fourth edition since it has covered many areas in comparison with the third edition. I should note that ... Read full review

Contents

1 Introduction
3
2 Types of Sound Change
23
3 Expressing Sound Changes
55
4 Phonetic and Phonemic Change
65
Procedures
78
6 Determining Relatedness
108
7 Internal Reconstruction
121
8 Computational and Statistical Methods
136
12 Syntactic Change
217
13 Observing Language Change
246
14 Language Contact
264
15 Cultural Reconstruction
299
Datasets
327
Notes
345
Language References
355
References
359

History and Challenges
162
10 Morphological Change
184
11 Semantic and Lexical Change
199

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About the author (2010)


Terry Crowley was Senior Lecturer in Linguistics at the University of Waikato in New Zealand.
Claire Bowern is Assistant Professor of Linguistics, Yale University.

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