An Introduction to Modern Literary Arabic

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Cambridge University Press, 1958 - Foreign Language Study - 205 pages
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The lessons are clear, in non-technical language, and have generous examples, with plenty of exercises for translation from Arabic to English and from English to Arabic. This is the manual that students interested in Arabic as a living and expanding world language will prefer. It is the first to deal mainly with modern literary Arabic. In Mr Cowan's words: 'The purpose is to explain to the students, in as concise a manner as possible, the grammatical structure of the modern Arabic literary language as it is found today in newspapers, magazines, books, the radio, and public speaking. I have endeavoured to restrict the material to the minimum which may serve as a stepping-stone to a deeper study of Arabic. As the fundamental grammar of written Arabic has hardly changed as an introduction to the classical language also. Having once mastered its contents the student should have a sound grasp of Arabic grammar and can then direct his studies towards modern literature or classical according to his needs and inclinations.
 

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Contents

The Arabic Alphabet
1
Pronunciation of the Consonants
3
Vowels
4
Doubled Consonants
5
Tanwln or Nunation
6
Madda
8
Punctuation
9
Gender
10
Lesson IX
61
Lesson X
69
Derivatives of Verbs page
77
Lesson XII
85
Lesson XIII
92
Prohibition
98
The Active Participle of a Doubled Verb
106
Lesson XVII
114

Singular Personal Pronouns
11
Lesson II
13
Lesson III
17
The Sound Masculine Plural
18
The Sound Feminine Plural
19
Dual and Plural Personal Pronouns 00
20
Lesson IV
22
Declension page
29
Prepositions
35
Comparative and Superlative
41
Lesson VII
48
Lesson VIII
54
The Passive of Hollow Verbs
122
The Passive of Weak Verbs
131
Lesson XIX
137
Verbal Form IV
143
Verbal Form VI
153
Verbal Form VIII
161
Lesson XXII
167
Nouns of Place and Instrument of Derived Verbs
173
To begin
179
The Ordinal Numbers
186
Days of the Week page
188
Conditional Sentences
195

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About the author (1958)

David Cowan is Professor of Law and Policy at the University of Bristol and a barrister at Arden Chambers. He has published widely in the area of housing and related research, and has acted as a consultant to the England and Wales Law Commission and the Department for Communities and Local Government.

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