An Introduction to Theories of Human Development

Front Cover
SAGE, Jan 22, 2004 - Psychology - 351 pages
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An Introduction to Theories of Human Development provides a comprehensive view of the primary theoretical models of human development including those from the biological, psychoanalytic, behavioral, and cognitive developmental perspectives. Along with a brief discussion of a historical background for each of these approaches, this book examines the application of these theories to various aspects of human development, such as the effectiveness of early intervention, individual differences, adolescence, and sociobiology.
 

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Contents

The Study of Human Development
3
Trends and Issues in Human Development
27
Arnold Gesell and the Maturational Model
59
Ethology and Sociohiology
79
5 Sigmund Freuds Psychosexual Theory
109
Erik Eriksons Focus on Psychosocial Development
139
Behavioral Models of Development
159
Social Learning Theory
197
Lev Vygotskys Sociocultural Theory of Development
277
Comparing Theories of Human Development
293
Glossary
309
References
319
Suggested Readings on Human Development
327
Name Index
341
Ahout the Author
351
Copyright

Jean Piagets Cognitive Model
229

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About the author (2004)

Neil J. Salkind received his PhD from the University of Maryland in Human Development. After teaching for 35 years at the University of Kansas, he remains a professor emeritus in the department of psychology and research in education, where he continues to collaborate with colleagues and work with students. His early interests were in the area of children’s cognitive development, and after research in the areas of cognitive style and (what was then known as) hyperactivity, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina’s Bush Center for Child and Family Policy. His work then changed direction to focus on child and family policy, specifically the impact of alternative forms of public support on various child and family outcomes. He has delivered more than 150 professional papers and presentations, written more than 100 trade and textbooks, and is the author of Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics (SAGE), Theories of Human Development (SAGE), and Exploring Research (Prentice Hall). He has edited several encyclopedias, including the Encyclopedia of Human Development, the Encyclopedia of Measurement and Statistics, and the recently published Encyclopedia of Research Design. He was editor of Child Development Abstracts and Bibliography for 13 years and lives in Lawrence, Kansas, where he likes to read, swim with the River City Sharks, letterpress print using 1820s technology, bake brownies (see the Excel version of Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics for the recipe at http://www.statisticsforpeople.com), and poke around old Volvos and old houses.

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