An Introduction to Transnational Criminal Law

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OUP Oxford, Sep 6, 2012 - Law - 352 pages
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The suppression of cross-border criminal activity has become a major global concern. An Introduction to Transnational Criminal Law examines how states, acting together, are responding to these forms of criminality through a combination of international treaty obligations and national criminal laws. Multilateral 'suppression conventions' oblige states parties to criminalise a broad range of activities including drug trafficking, terrorism, transnational organised crime, corruption, and money laundering, and to provide for different types of international procedural cooperation like extradition and mutual legal assistance in regard to these offences. Usually regarded as a sub-set of international criminal justice, this system of law is beginning to receive greater attention as a subject in its own right as the scale of the criminal threat and the complexity of synergyzing the criminal laws of different states is more fully understood. The book is divided into three parts. Part A asks and attempts to answer what is transnational crime and what is transnational criminal law? Part B explores a selection of substantive transnational crimes from piracy through to cybercrime. Part C examines the main procedural mechanisms involved in establishing jurisdiction and then the exercise of jurisdiction through the effective investigation and prosecution of transnational crimes. Finally, Part D looks at the implementation of transnational criminal law and the prospects for transnational criminal justice. Until recently this system of law has been largely the domain of professionals. An Introduction to Transnational Criminal Law provides a comprehensive introduction designed to fill that gap.
 

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Contents

Yemeni Citizens Extradition Case Individual constitutional
Table of International Cases
Peru vChile Appeal decision Rol No 224206 ILDC 1443 CL 21 September 2007 221 2007
INDIA
KENYA
Arriola Case No A 891 XLVI Supreme Court of Justice 25 August
CYPRUS
EUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTSECTHR
SOUTH AFRICA
Lotus CaseFrancevTurkey 1927PCIJReports SeriesANo 10 28 136141160
Zeev Rosenstein v Israel Appeal judgment Crim A 459605 ILDC
Yuen Yei Ha 2005 FJHC 165 56
Terrorism Conspiracy
AUSTRALIA
United Kingdom 1987 9 EHRR 1 242
Asean Explorer Judgment on Appeal in Cassation no HR 0055501

PERMANENT COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
Table of Treaties andOther International Instruments List of Abbreviations PARTA INTRODUCTION
a policy response 1 3 4 The nature ofthe policymaking process 2 WHAT IS TRANSNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW? 2 1 The transnationality of crim...
PIRACY AND MARITIME SAFETY OFFENCES
MIGRANT SMUGGLING
Sianturi and orsv Indonesia Constitutional Review Nos2 3PUU V2007 ILDC 1041 ID 2007 23 October 2007 57 IRELAND
DRUG TRAFFICKING
FIJI
TERRORISM
crime?
of an organized criminal group
Alvaroand orsAppeal judgment on admissibility Case
COLOMBIA
ITALY
Public Prosecutor vA Band F J Appeal judgment Case noB3687 05 ILDC 280 SE 2005 3 October 2005 68
NV ICLBLTR and NV S v JS Appeal judgment ILDC 1503
GERMANY
POLAND
Bozano vFrance 1986 ECHR16233 Butler v United Kingdom Application No 4166198 27 June 2002 242
CORRUPTION
BRAZIL
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Professor Neil Boister teaches Criminal Law, Transnational Criminal Law, International Criminal Law, and International Law at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. His principal research interest is the suppression of transnational crime through international law. He has written numerous articles on the subject. Neil Boister works as a consultant for NGOs in the area of the legal regulation of transnational crime and is currently involved in the development of a Protocol on the Illicit Trade in Tobacco. Finally, he is also the author of a number of pieces in international criminal law strict sensu, including The Tokyo International Military Tribunal, A Reappraisal (Oxford: OUP, 2008) (together with Professor Cryer).

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