An Introduction to the Philosophy of Art

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 25, 2003 - Art - 285 pages
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Richard Eldridge presents a clear and compact survey of philosophical theories of the nature and significance of art. Drawing on materials from classical and contemporary philosophy as well as from literary theory and art criticism, he explores the representational, expressive, and formal dimensions of art, and he argues that works of art present their subject matter in ways that are of enduring cognitive, moral, and social interest. His accessible study will be invaluable to students and to all readers who are interested in the relation between thought and art.
 

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Contents

The situation and tasks of the philosophy of art
2
Philosophy as articulation
5
Art as a natural social practice
6
Action gesture and expressive freedom
8
Schiller on art life and modernity
13
Identification versus elucidation
18
What may we hope for from the philosophy of art?
22
Representation imitation and resemblance
26
Identifying and evaluating art
151
Smith and Bourdieu
154
Dickies institutional theory
157
Levinson and Carroll
160
Mothersill and Savile
162
Hume on feeling and judgment
165
Kant on feeling and judgment
171
Isenberg Scruton and Cohen on taste
179

Aristotle on imitation
27
Visual depiction resemblance and gameplaying
32
Representing as natural human worldresponsive activity
38
Functions of artistic representation
42
Beauty and form
48
Kant on natural and artistic beauty
52
General versus individual form
57
Beardsleys theory of individual form
58
Criticisms of formalistaesthetic theories of art
61
Defenses of the aesthetic interest of art
64
Expression
69
What is expressed in art? Hegel versus Danto
75
How is artistic expression achieved?
85
Why does artistic expression matter?
97
Originality and imagination
103
Hegels criticisms of subjectivism
108
Adorno on free meaningmaking
110
postmodernism and feminism
115
Originality and imagination within common life
120
Scruton and Coleridge on artistic imagination
123
Understanding art
129
Hegel Baxandall and others
132
Abrams Fish and Derrida
136
The special importance of elucidation of formalsemantic elements
143
The possibility of agreement in understanding
147
Art and emotion
184
The paradox of fiction
186
Hume on tragedy
188
Walton Levinson and Feagin
191
Danto and Cohen
196
Aristotle on catharsis
199
Artistic making and the working through of emotion
201
Art and morality
206
Autonomism and experimentalism
208
Moralism and the clarification of thought and feeling
215
Art propaganda advertising and cliché
223
Ethical understanding and working through puzzlement
226
Art and society some contemporary practices of art
232
Schiller and others
234
Lukács Marcuse and Adorno
240
Lévi Strauss and Althusser
242
Fosters postmodern sociocultural criticism
246
Can artistic beauty still matter? What about fun?
247
Art and social aspiration
249
primitivism avantgardism vernacularism and constructivism
250
the evidence of things not seen
260
Bibliography
265
Index
278
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About the author (2003)

Richard Eldridge is Professor of Philosophy at Swarthmore College and has published widely on the philosophy of art and literature.

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