An Introduction to the Study of Astrology: In the Light of Physical Sciences

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K. Krishnaswami Ayar, 1900 - 57 pages
 

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Page 18 - Tidal action (itself partly due to the sun's agency) exercises here a comparatively slight influence The effect of oceanic currents (mainly originating in that influence), though slight in abrasion, is powerful in diffusing and transporting the matter abraded ; and when we consider the immense transfer of matter so produced, the increase of pressure over large spaces in the bed of the ocean, and diminution over corresponding portions of the land, we are not at a loss to perceive how the elastic...
Page 18 - The sun's rays are the ultimate source of almost every motion which takes place on the surface of the earth. By its heat are produced all winds, and those disturbances in the electric equilibrium of the atmosphere which give rise to the phenomena of lightning, and probably also to those of terrestrial magnetism and the aurora.
Page 18 - By them the waters of the sea are made to circulate in vapor through the air, and irrigate the land, producing springs and rivers. By them are produced all disturbances of the chemical equilibrium of the elements of nature, which by a series of compositions and decompositions give rise to new products and originate a transfer of materials.
Page 18 - ... man, and the sources of those great deposits of dynamical efficiency which are laid up for human use in our coal strata. By them the waters of the sea are made to circulate in vapour through the air, and irrigate the land, producing springs and rivers. By them are produced all disturbances of the chemical equilibrium of the elements of nature, which, by a series of compositions and decompositions, give rise to new products, and originate a transfer of materials. Even the slow degradation of the...
Page 18 - By them are produced all disturbances of the chemical equilibrium of the elements of nature, which by a series of compositions and decompositions give rise to new products and originate a transfer of materials. Even the slow degradation of the solid constituents of the surface, in which its chief geological change consists, is almost entirely due, on the one hand, to the abrasion of wind or rain and the alternation of heat and frost ; on the other, to the continual beating of sea waves agitated by...
Page 16 - ... species. Spallanzani observes, that certain animalcules devour others so voraciously, that they fatten and become indolent and sluggish by overfeeding. After a meal of this kind, if they be confined in distilled water, so as...
Page 50 - Relation»cial centre for the merchants of Italy and Egypt, as it was at a much earlier period for all Asiatic races, from Phoenicia in the West to China in the East. The oldest codes record a very advanced system of commercial exchanges among the Hindu tribes, regulated by wise and just provisions ; and a high respect for trade is shown by the permission granted the Brahmans, in violation of...
Page 50 - Its delicate tissues, its marvellous colors and dyes, its porcelains, its work in metals and precious stones, its dainty essences and perfumes, have not only been the wonder and delight of Europe, but in no slight degree helped in the revival of art.
Page 18 - ... is powerful in diffusing and transporting the matter abraded ; and, when we consider the immense transfer of matter so produced, the increase of pressure over large spaces in the bed of the ocean, and diminution over corresponding portions of the land, we are not at a loss to perceive how the elastic force of subterranean fires, thus repressed on the one hand and released on the other, may break forth in points where the resistance is barely adequte to their retention, and thus bring the phenomena...
Page 50 - Yet the intellectual life of India was profoundly felt throughout the ancient world. Greece, Persia, Egypt even, went to sit at the feet of these serene dreamers on the Indus and under the banyan shades, from the time of Alexander downwards ; and there they marvelled at the power of philosophy to achieve ideal virtue. And what treasures of European fable, legend, and mythic drama further testify to the extent of our indebtedness to India in the sphere of imagination and fancy, down to the magic mirror,...

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