An Introductory Grammar of Rabbinic Hebrew

Front Cover
BRILL, 1999 - Religion - 327 pages
0 Reviews
In Greek and Roman Palestine we find a Hebrew dialect that had existed alongside the literary language of Biblical Hebrew but had followed its own pattern of development. After the destruction of the Temple, the rabbis elevated this dialect to the status of a literary language, 'Rabbinic Hebrew', and employed it in the composition of the Mishnah, Tosefta, and halakhic "midrashim," This volume is a practical grammar of Rabbinic Hebrew that brings M.H. Segal's 1927 grammar up to date by incorporating the results of recent investigations in this field. It also adds a clearly pedagogic perspective, with vocabulary and exercises in every unit, and introduces readers to the thinking of the Sages of Israel (each unit commences with a text that bears on a theological, historical, literary, or methodological topic).
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Absolute and construct 68
1
Nouns
14
Perfect relates to past sometimes present B Participle
17
Demonstratives
21
Unit3 Article
25
Interrogatives
34
Reflexive and reciprocal structures
44
Noun patterns
56
Unit 2 Imperative
150
Prepositions and conjunctions
159
BH and RH demonstratives 4 Strengthened forms 5
181
Interrogative clauses
191
Comparative clauses
197
Temporal clauses
205
Conditional clauses
213
Causal clauses
221

Gender and number of nouns
62
Adjectives
80
Conjugations binyanim
95
Tenses and moods
104
Perfect
113
Imperfect
121
Participle
129
Infinitive
143
Final and consecutive clauses
229
Concessive clauses
239
Adversative clauses
244
Bibliography
255
Texts
267
Hebrew and Aramaic forms
276
Verb conjugations binyanim
303
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 261 - Caves 5 and 6 appeared in M. Baillet, JT Milik, and R. de Vaux, Les 'Petites' Grottes de Qumran (Oxford, 1962), pp.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

Miguel Perez Fernandez, Ph.D. (1975) in Semitic Philology, Madrid, is Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature in the University of Granada. He is series editor of "Biblioteca Midrasica," in which series he has published translations, with commentaries, of "Pirqe Rabbi Eliezer" (Valencia, 1984), "Sifre" to Numbers (Valencia, 1989) and "Sifra" (Estella, 1997). John F. Elwolde Ph.D. (1988) in Linguistics, Hull, is an Associate Member of the Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford. His publications in the fields of Hebrew language and the Dead Sea Scrolls include translations of A. Saenz-Badillos's "A history of the Hebrew Language" (Cambridge, 1993) and M. Perez Fernandez's "An Introductory Grammar of Rabbinic Hebrew" (Leiden, 1997).

Bibliographic information