An Irish-English Dictionary ...

Front Cover
J. Duffy, 1864 - English language - 725 pages
0 Reviews
An Irish-English dictionary : with copious quotations from the most esteemed ancient and modern writers, to elucidate the meaning of obscure words, and numerous comparisons of Irish words with those of similar orthography, sense, or sound in the Welsh and Hebrew languages. With a supplement by John O'Donovan.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Popular passages

Page 6 - ... bards, as their heathenish predecessors most certainly could have no notion of the plain of Sennaar, of Pharaoh, or of Moses ; objects not to be known but from the Holy Scriptures, or some writings derived from them, such as those of Josephus, Philo, &c., never known to the Irish bards before their Christianity. I have remarked in another work not as yet published, that our Christian bards did not lose much time in availing themselves of the sacred history to frame this story, inasmuch as we...
Page 6 - Egyptian princess Scota. This discovery I have said was necessarily reserved to our Christian bards, as their heathenish predecessors most certainly could have no notion of the plain of Sennaar, of Pharaoh, or of Moses ; objects not to be known but from the holy Scriptures, or some writings derived from them, such as those of Josephus, Philo, etc., never known to the Irish bards before Christianity.
Page 581 - ... books, by reason that they lost the estates they had to uphold their publique teaching, and that the nobility of the Irish line, who would encourage and support their posterity, lost all their estates too, so that the antiquaryes posterity were forced to follow husbandry, etc., to get their bread, for want of patrons to support them.
Page 6 - Gaill and łulic, doubtless by our heathenish bards, who inserted the letter d, that we owe the important discovery, necessarily reserved to their successors who embraced Christianity, of those illustrious personages Gadel and Gadelus; the former an usher under that royal school-master, Pheniusa...
Page 5 - ... adventitious to, or originally inseparable from the radical formation of the word, should both be of the same denomination or class of either broad or small vowels : and this without any regard to the primitive elementary structure of the word.
Page 265 - Carthaginenses. From the manner of this inscription some writers have concluded that the letter g was not in the Roman alphabet, nor used in the Latin tongue till after the first Punic War; and Plutarch informs us that it was brought in by Sp. Carvilius, wherefore Diomedes calls it Nova Consona. But there is this other foundation for judging that the Latins had the y, or g, from the beginning, as a quite different letter from the к : viz.
Page 326 - Scotland a large cbrystal, of a figure somewhat oval, was kept by the priests to work charms by ; water poured upon it at this day is given to cattle against diseases : these stones are now preserved by the oldest and most superstitious in the country (Shawe). They were once common in Ireland.
Page 343 - Latins familiarly eclipse 6 in some words, as for submitto we pronounce summitto ; wherefore we should be the less surprised if such indifferences and dubious words be found in a language so much neglected and uncultivated as the Irish language has been for some ages past. It is to be noted, that though m aspirated is frequently substituted in the place of an aspirated b...
Page 5 - LeatAn, has been wofully destructive to the original and radical purity of the Irish language. This latter rule (much of a more modern invention than the former, for our old manuscripts...

Bibliographic information