An Odyssey Through the Brain, Behavior and the Mind

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Springer Science & Business Media, Feb 28, 2003 - Medical - 176 pages
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Much of contemporary behavioral or cognitive neuroscience is concerned with discovering the neural basis of psychological processes such as attention, cognition, consciousness, perception, and memory. In sharp divergence from this field, An Odyssey Through the Brain, Behavior and the Mind can be regarded as an elaborate demonstration that the large scale features of brain electrical activity are related to sensory and motor processes in various ways but are not organised in accordance with conventional psychological concepts. It is argued that much of the traditional lore concerning the mind is based on prescientific philosophical assumptions and has little relevance to brain function.

The first ten chapters of An Odyssey Through the Brain, Behavior and the Mind give a personal account of how the various discoveries that gave rise to these views came to be made. This is followed by discussions of brain organization in relation to behavior, learning and memory, sleep and consciousness, and the general problem of the mind.

 

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Contents

A Preparation and a Beginning
1
Hippocampal Activity and Behavior
7
Hippocampal Slow Waves Learning and Instinctive Behavior
25
Two Afferent Systems Control the Activation of the Neocortex and Hippocampus
39
The Anatomical and Neurochemical Basis of AtropineResistant Neocortical Activation
65
The Anatomical and Neurochemical Basis of AtropineResistant Hippocampal Rhythmical Slow Activity
79
Ascending Cholinergic Control of the Neocortex and Hippocampus
91
What is the Function of Cerebral Cortical Activation?
105
Whatever Became of the Ascending Reticular Activating System?
117
Olfactory Reactions in the Dentate Gyrus and Pyriform Cortex
135
The Mind and Behavioral Neuroscience
153
Epilogue
169
Index
171
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About the author (2003)

C. H. Vanderwolf is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychology and in the Graduate Program in Neuroscience at the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.

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