An Old-Fashioned Girl

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ReadHowYouWant.com, Jan 14, 2008 - Fiction - 492 pages
19 Reviews
A masterpiece based on the altering circumstances of a town girl, An Old-Fashioned Girl was published in 1870. Set in late nineteenth century, the work presents Polly who comes to the city and lives with a rich urban family. How her simplicity and zest for life affects all those around her is the main focus of the work. That the material gains are not the only important factors of life is amply manifested. It further teaches about the duties that one owes to their family.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SueinCyprus - LibraryThing

This is a wonderful, somewhat weepy old-fashioned kind of book really intended for teenagers but probably read more by younger girls and adults these days. It was written in about 1870 so inevitably ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - aine.fin - LibraryThing

A sweet book which reminded me of the happy times reading the Little Women books when I was a child. Alcott always inspires me to better myself! The first part stands somewhat alone and has a ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
22
III
44
IV
64
V
87
VI
110
VII
156
VIII
180
XI
261
XII
285
XIII
312
XIV
339
XV
363
XVI
390
XVII
408
XVIII
436

IX
207
X
230
XIX
456
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About the author (2008)

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Alcott early realized that her father could not be counted on as sole support of his family, and so she sacrificed much of her own pleasure to earn money by sewing, teaching, and churning out potboilers. Her reputation was established with Hospital Sketches (1863), which was an account of her work as a volunteer nurse in Washington, D.C. Alcott's first works were written for children, including her best-known Little Women (1868--69) and Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (1871). Moods (1864), a "passionate conflict," was written for adults. Alcott's writing eventually became the family's main source of income. Throughout her life, Alcott continued to produce highly popular and idealistic literature for children. An Old-Fashioned Girl (1870), Eight Cousins (1875), Rose in Bloom (1876), Under the Lilacs (1878), and Jack and Jill (1881) enjoyed wide popularity. At the same time, her adult fiction, such as the autobiographical novel Work: A Story of Experience (1873) and A Modern Mephistopheles (1877), a story based on the Faust legend, shows her deeper concern with such social issues as education, prison reform, and women's suffrage. She realistically depicts the problems of adolescents and working women, the difficulties of relationships between men and women, and the values of the single woman's life.

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