An Academy for Grown Horsemen; Containing the Completest Instructions for Walking, Trotting, Cantering, Galloping, Stumbling and Tumbling: The Annals of Horsemanship: Containing Accounts of Accidental Experiments and Experimental Accidents, Both Successful and Unsuccessful;

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Vernor, Hood, and Sharpe; Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme; J. Walker; J. Harris; and W. Bayne; at the union printing-office, 1808 - Horsemanship - 97 pages
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Page 13 - These are usually accounted six in number, viz. the Lever, the Wheel and Axle, the Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw.
Page 5 - ... the stones out of his way, which might otherwise throw him down. If he turns out his toes as well as he should do, he will then disperse them to the right and the left, and not ha"Ve the trouble of kicking the same stone a second time. A bald face, wall eyes, and white legs (if your horse...
Page 74 - The BEAUTIES of HISTORY ; or, Pictures of Virtue and Vice, drawn from examples of Men eminent for their Virtues, or infamous for their Vices. Selected for the instruction and entertainment of Youth. By the late Dr.
Page 21 - ... from his box, or a footman from behind the coach, and placed him in the carriage by the side of his Mistress. I propose also to devote part of my labours to the service of the fair sex, in composing a set of easy rules for riding gracefully between a pair of panniers, and supporting a butter-basket in the most elegant style ; a thorough possession of these attractions may draw the attention of the foxhunting Squires, and possibly raise the Lady possessing them to the dignity of Spouse to his...
Page i - ANNALS OF HORSEMANSHIP: Containing accounts of Accidental Experiments and Experimental Accidents, both successful and unsuccessful : Communicated by various correspondents to Geoffrey...
Page 31 - Tis a fharper, who flakes his penury Againft thy plenty who takes thy ready cafh, And pays thee nought but wifhes, hopes, and promifes, The currency of ideots. Injurious bankrupt, That gulls the eafy creditor! Tomorrow ! It is a period no where to be found, In all the hoary regifters of Time, Unlefs perchance in the fool's calendar. Wifdom difclaims the word, nor holds fociety With thofe who own it. No, my Horatio, 'Tis Fancy's child, and Folly is its father; Wrought of fuch fluff as dreams are ;...
Page vii - May many be the necks it preserves for nobler purposes! ******** thus publiekly to acknowledge my obligations to him. ****** As I shall be as concise and explicit as possible in the valuable instructions and discoveries I am now about to communicate to the world ; it will be the reader's own fault, if he does not profitably benefit by them. When I have told him how to...
Page 5 - ... much so, as if their eyes were any way concerned in the action of the animal. As I know they are not, I give myself very little trouble about them. If a rider is in full possession of his own, what his horse has is perfectly immaterial; having probably a bridle in his mouth to direct him where to go, and to lift him up with again, if he tumbles down. Any gentleman...
Page 13 - ... you spur the saddle cloth ; if you are leggy you never touch him at all ; and if middling you only wear out your own girths, without your horse being a bit the better for it. Elegance of position is to be considered as particularly essential to every gentleman that appears on horseback in publick. And I shall endeavour to point out what most immediately constitutes it. The mode of leaning the body pretty forward over the pommel of the saddle, in a walk or a trot, has been too little in practice...
Page 6 - ... are of little consequence; and as I am, no doubt, the first author that has made it known, my readers, if they lose no time, may mount themselves at Aldridge's, or the Rhedarium, as well and for half the money they would have done, before I let them into this secret.

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