An Account of All the Pictures Exhibited in the Rooms of the British Institution: From 1813 to 1823, Belonging to the Nobility and Gentry of England: with Remarks, Critical and Explanatory ...

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Priestley and Weale, 1824 - Painting - 320 pages
 

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Page 316 - May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me...
Page xxiv - Royal founder; that the present age may vie in arts with that of Leo the Tenth; and that the dignity of the dying Art (to make use of an expression of Pliny) may be revived under the reign of George the Third.
Page xi - The extraordinary assemblage of works of Art deposited in the Louvre at Paris, appears in this respect, on the first view, quite embarrassing. All is confusion and astonishment : the eye is dazzled and bewildered, wandering from side to side — from picture to picture...
Page 55 - I reflect, not without vanity, that these Discourses bear testimony of my admiration of that truly divine man; and I should desire that the last words which I should pronounce in this Academy, and from this place, might be the name of — MICHAEL ANGELO*.
Page 117 - Poussin in the latter part of his life changed from his dry manner to one much softer and richer, where there is a greater union between the figures and...
Page xvi - Рай-Май. 1. The Embarkation of the Queen of Sheba — Claude. 2. The Marriage of Rebecca— Claude. 3. Ganymede — Titian. 4. The Rape of the Sabines — Rubens. 5. The Emperor Theodosius expelled the Church by St Ambrose — Vandyke. 6. St John in the Wilderness — A. Caracci. 7. Susannah and the Elders— Lud. Caracci. 8. A Bacchanalian Triumph— N. Poussin. 9. Ermenia with the Shepherds— Domenichino. 10. Philip the Fourth of Spain, and hii Queen — Velasquts. 11. Venus and Adonis —...
Page 203 - Sometimes he drew portraits, and came with that view to England, but found the business too much engrossed by Kneller, Closterman, and others. Yet he once drew king William; but, as the piece was to be by candle-light, he gave his majesty...
Page 77 - More from his art than from their actions claim. Bright, beyond all the rest, CORREGGIO flings His ample lights, and round them gently brings The mingling shade. In all his works we view Grandeur of style, and chastity of hue.
Page 117 - No works of any modern have so much of the air of Antique Painting as those of Poussin. His best performances have a remarkable dryness of manner, which though by no means to be recommended for imitation, yet seems perfectly correspondent to that ancient simplicity which distinguishes his style. Like Polidoro, he studied the ancients so much that he acquired a habit of thinking...
Page 246 - Hogarth ; considering him rather as a writer of comedy with a pencil, than as a painter. If catching the manners and follies of an age living as they rise, if general satire on vices and ridicules, familiarised by strokes of nature, and heightened by wit, and the whole animated by proper and just expressions of the passions, be comedy, Hogarth composed comedies as much as Moliere : in his " Marriage a la Mode" there is even an intrigue carried on throughout the piece.

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