An Account of Divers Choice Remarks, as Well as Geographical, as Historical, Political, Mathematical, Physical, and Moral Taken in a Journey Through the Low-Countries, France, Italy, and Part of Spain with the Isles of Sicily and Malta ... as Also, a Voyage to the Levant ...

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S. Smith and B. Walford, 1701 - Europe - 300 pages
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Page 108 - till Monsieur has a Hand in't; and my Lady relishes not her Victuals unless they 're served with a French Sauce. The Exchange Women would have a poor Trade, had they not the knack of Frenchifying their Wares ; and a Courtier could hardly pretend to the Quality of Huff and Beau, unless he 'd spent some time at a French Academy, and entertain'd Masters of Sciences of that Nation. But, on the contrary, in France they employ none willingly but their own...
Page 150 - PRINCIPI. SENATVS. PQR QVOD. ACCESSVM. ITALIAE. HOC ETIAM. ADDITO. EX. PECVNIA. SVA. PORTV. TVTIOREM. NAVIGANTIBVS REDDIDERIT.
Page 164 - GALLIENO. CLEMENTISSIMO. PRINCIPI CVIVS. INVICTA. VIRTVS SOLA. PIETATE. SVPERATA. EST ET. SALONINAE. SANCTISSIMAE. AVG. M. AVRELIVS. VICTOR DEDICATISSIMVS NVMINI. MAIESTATIQVE EORVM From an ancient inscription at Ferentino we learn that the prcenomen of Salonina was Cornelia.
Page 310 - Lake is from the middle of June to the middle of September. During this season, the most active days are week-ends and holidays.
Page 150 - DIVI. NERVAE. F. NERVAE. . TRAIANO. OPTIMO. AVG. GERMANIC. DACICO. PONT. MAX. TR. POT. XVIIII. IMP. IX. COS: VI. PP PROV1DENTISSIMO.
Page 19 - Holland is wood. He adds (p. 19): " In their Turf- Pits they often find Oak Trees entire, the Timber of which is harder, more solid and blacker than that of our ordinary Oak .... We find divers of these Trees in Devonshire, in Bogs and fenny Ground .... Our Country People call it Black Oak.
Page 14 - Both their bodies being stripped naked, were dragged out of town and hung up by the legs at the common gallows, where their bowels were pulled out and their limbs minced into a thousand pieces, everyone present endeavouring to get his share; some got a finger some a toe and others a piece of their flesh, which they preserved in oil and spirit of wine as trophies of their matchless vengeance.

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