An Account of the British Settlement of Honduras: Being a View of Its Commercial and Agricultural Resources, Soil, Climate, Natural History, &c

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R. Baldwin, 1811 - Belize - 237 pages
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Page 146 - Myriads of Swallows are also the occasional inhabitants of Honduras. The time of their residence is generally confined to the period of the rains, after which they totally disappear. There is something remarkably curious and deserving of notice in the ascent of these birds. As soon as the dawn appears, they quit their place of rest, which is usually chosen amid the rushes of some watery savannah...
Page 59 - ... at which he aims. On some occasions, no ordinary stratagem is necessary to be resorted to by the huntsman to prevent others from availing themselves of the advantage of his discoveries ; for, if his steps be traced by those who may be engaged in the same pursuit, which is a very common thing, all his ingenuity must be exerted to beguile them from the true track.
Page 58 - He cuts his way through the thickest of the woods to some elevated situation, and climbs the tallest trees he finds, from which he minutely surveys the surrounding country. At this season the leaves of the mahogany tree are invariably of a yellow reddish hue, and an eye accustomed to this kind of exercise can, at a great distance, discern the places where the wood is most abundant. He now descends, and to such places his steps are directed...
Page 57 - Each gang of slaves has one belonging to it, who is styled the huntsman. He is generally selected from the most intelligent of his fellows, and his chief occupation is to search the woods, or as in this country it is termed, the bush, to find labour for the whole. A negro of this description is often valued at more than five hundred pounds.
Page 59 - To such a spot are his steps directed ; and without compass or other guide than what his recollection affords, he never fails to reach the exact point at which he aims. On some occasions, no ordinary stratagem is necessary to be resorted to by the huntsman, to prevent others from availing themselves of the advantage of his discoveries ; for, if his steps be traced by those who may be engaged in the same pursuit, which is a very common occurrence, all his ingenuity must be exerted to beguile them...
Page 57 - August the huntsman is dispatched on his errand ; and if his owner be working on his own ground, this is seldom an employment of much delay or difficulty. He cuts his way through the thickest of the woods to the highest spots, and climbs the tallest tree he finds, from which he minutely surveys the surrounding country. At this season the leaves...
Page 60 - ... spot, — and it consequently happens that persons so engaged must frequently undergo the disappointment of finding an advantage they had promised to themselves seized on by others. The hidden treasure being...
Page 147 - ... and invariably rise to a certain height, in a compact spiral form, and which at a distance often occasions them to be taken for an immense column of smoke. This attained, they are then seen separately to disperse in search of food, the occupation of their day. To those who may have had...
Page 12 - The climate of this part of the American continent is greatly superior to that of most other parts of the same vast portion of the globe, either in higher or lower degrees of latitude. It is equally superior to the climate of the...
Page 240 - THE HOLY BIBLE; containing the Old and New Testaments, according to the authorised Versions ; with Notes by several learned and pious Reformers ; those on the New Testament being by Theodore Beza : as printed by Royal Authority at the Time of the Reformation : To which are added, by the present Editor, Dissertations on the several Portions of the Holy Scripture, additional Notes, &c.

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