An Account of the Harvard Greek Play

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J. R. Osgood, 1881 - 129 pages
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Page 27 - But be his My special thanks, whose even-balanced soul, From first youth tested up to extreme old age, Business could not make dull, nor passion wild ; Who saw life steadily, and saw it whole ; The mellow glory of the Attic stage, Singer of sweet Colonus, and its child.
Page 22 - It follows from all this, that the average ability of the Athenian race is on the lowest possible estimate, very nearly two grades higher than our own — that is, about as much as our race is above that of the African Negro. This estimate, which may seem prodigious to some, is confirmed by the quick intelligence and high culture of the Athenian commonalty, before whom literary works were recited, and works of art exhibited, of a far more severe character than...
Page 103 - The play ends with the solemn warning of the chorus " to reckon no man happy till ye witness the closing day ; until he pass the border which severs life from death, unscathed by sorrow.
Page 32 - Come, and look on me, 0 Death, O Death ! — and yet in yonder world 1 shall dwell with thee, speak enough with thee ; And Thee I call, thou light of golden day, Thou Sun, who drivest on thy glorious car, Thee, for this last time, never more again. O Light, O sacred land that was my home ; O Salamis, where stands my father's hearth, Thou glorious Athens, with thy kindred race ; Ye streams and rivers here, and Tro'ia's plains, To you that fed my life I bid farewell ; This last, last word does Aias...
Page 99 - twas terrible To see what followed. For he tore away The brooch-pins that had fastened her attire, And, lifting, smote his eyeballs to the root, Saying, Henceforth they should not see the evil Suffered or done by him in the past time, But evermore in darkness now should scan The features he ought never to have seen, And not-discern the souls he longed to know.
Page 40 - ... Restrained myself. And when the morrow came I went and charged my father and my mother With what I thus had heard. They heaped reproach On him who stirred the matter, and I soothed My soul with what they told me ; yet it teased, Still vexing more and more ; and so I went, Unknown to them, to Pytho, and the God Sent me forth shamed, unanswered in my quest ; And other things He spake, dread, dire, and dark, That I should join in wedlock with my mother, Beget a brood that men should loathe to look...
Page 32 - Come and look on me, 0 Death, O Death, — and yet in yonder world 1 shall dwell with thee, speak enough with thee ; And thee I call, thou light of golden day, Thou Sun, who drivest on thy glorious car, Thee, for this last time, — never more again ! O Light, O sacred land that was my home ; O Salamis, where stands my father's hearth, Thou glorious Athens, with thy kindred race ; Ye streams and rivers here, and Troia's plains, To you that fed my life I bid farewell ; This last...
Page 44 - Art may tell a truth Obliquely, do the thing shall breed the thought, Nor wrong the thought, missing the mediate word. So may you paint your picture, twice show truth, Beyond mere imagery on the wall, — So, note by note, bring music from your mind, Deeper than ever e'en Beethoven dived, — So write a book shall mean beyond the facts, Suffice the eye and save the soul beside.
Page 96 - Supposing he would take him far away Unto the land whence he was come. But he Preserved him to great sorrow. For if thou Art he this man hath said, be well assured Thou bear'st a heavy doom.
Page 83 - ... of costume. Let us see how the first complex group fulfilled this condition. On the stage left stood Oedipus, in rich but deep-toned red ; on the right, Creon, equally in red, but of a color entirely different in scale ; the attendants of the king, in lavender tunics bordered with gold-embroidered white, flanked the doorway ; and the two attendants of Jocasta, in delicate blue and salmon, brought the eye by a pleasing graduation in intensity of color and strength of tone up to the figure of the...

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