An account of the state of the Roman-Catholick religion throughout the world. Transl. To which is added, A discourse concerning the state of religion in England. Transl. With a large dedication to the present pope, by sir Richard Steele [really B. Hoadly.].

Front Cover
1716
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 186 - I. b the world to Pope Innocent XI. in the latter part of the seventeenth century, " It seems to be the constant opinion of ALL the members of the Congregation, that little credit is to be given to the Relations, Letters, and Solicitations that come from the missionaries. Hence it is, that the usual answer of the Congregation consists only in asking further information, which often proves of no use.
Page iv - ... always in the right. We cannot but esteem the advantage to be exceedingly on our side, in this case, because we have all the benefits of infallibility, without the absurdity of pretending to it ; and without the uneasy task of maintaining a point so shocking to the understanding of mankind. And you must pardon us, if we cannot help thinking it to be as great and as glorious a privilege in us to be always in the right, without the pretence to infallibility, as it can be in you to be always in...
Page x - Son below his own Father in any degree of real perfection, this is an unpardonable error; so unpardonable, that all hands were united against that unhappy man; and he found at length, that he had much better have violated all God's commandments, than have interpreted some passages of Scripture differently from his Brethren. The...
Page xv - ... the right of the people to search and consider the Gospel themselves, it is but taking care, in some other of our controversies, to fix it upon them, that they must not abuse this right ; that they must not pretend to be wiser than their superiors ; that they must take care to understand particular texts as the church understands them, and as their guides, who have an interpretative authority, explain them. This we find to be as effectual with many, as taking the Scriptures out of their hands....
Page x - Ireland by one who could not see exactly what they saw about the nature of Christ before his appearance in this world. For as with you, a man had better blaspheme Almighty God, than not magnify the Blessed Virgin, so with many of us it is much more innocent and less hazardous to take from the glory of the Father, than of his Son. Nay, to bring down the Father to a level with his own Son is a commendable work, and the applauded labour of many learned men of leisure; but to place the Son below...
Page lxvii - Trouble the world no more with quarrels about the holy sepulchre ; but believe that he is risen, who once was laid in it. Let the wood of his cross cease to be magnified to an immense bulk ; and his natural body cease to be multiplied to an infinite number. Restore the heads of holy men and women to their bodies, if they can be found. Let the bones of the dead saints be at rest, and their blood be released from the perpetual fatigue of working wonders. Throw up all your legends ; discard all your...
Page iv - ... that you cannot err in any thing you determine, and we never do. That is, in other words, that you are infallible, and we always in the right. We cannot but esteem the advantage to be exceedingly on our side, in this case, because we have all the benefits of infallibility, without the absurdity of pretending to it...
Page xi - Scotland, let a man depart an inch from the confession of faith, and rulejof worship, established by the assembly : and he will quickly find, that, as cold a country as it is, it will be too hot for him to live in.
Page xxx - ... whole city, immediately following the plague which consumed vast numbers of its inhabitants, furnished matter for this humour. How easy was it found to make these to be great judgments upon account of that very restoration. Now the same impious humour, which is the very essence of fanaticism, let it be in what church it will, can do with a thousand times smaller matters. A fire not to be named with that, a mortality amongst our cattle, which all Europe hath felt much more grievously ; these are...
Page xxix - ... awake. But then everything on this side death, still remains untouched, to us : We can molest, harass, imprison, and ruin, any man who pretends to be wiser than his betters. And the more unspotted the man's character is, the more necessary we think it to take such crushing methods. One thing more I must here mention ; that the church (I mean that part of the churchmen, I am speaking of,) is now in full possession of the privilege of applying God's judgments to their neighbours : which our forefathers...

Bibliographic information