An Address Commemorative of George W. Clinton: Delivered Before the Buffalo Historical Society, March 24, 1890

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Press of Baker, Jones & Company, 1890 - 29 pages
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Page 28 - ... afternoon, to find the latest lingering flowers of the year, and in that search, which had been the joy of his life, without warning or failure or decay of his faculties, his life suddenly ended. Nature seemed to have reclaimed the old man, whose heart the love of her had kept as warm and unwasted as a child's. Like Enoch, in that tranquil, beneficent, blameless life, he walked with God, and God took him. One glorious summer's day in the year 1850, it was the office of Judge Clinton to consecrate...
Page 20 - Not to speak of his eminent professional career, he has taught us the sweet humanities and that unbought grace of life which are the highest and purest social charm.
Page 22 - ... transmutation of a species requires vast spaces of time, its truth can be of no immediate consequence. But with all deference to that gentleman, I say — his trope is false. If one will consider how different plants affect different climes, localities and seasons, and their orderly succession, he must reject the trope. Look, for instance, in earliest spring, upon the low margin of that river, skirting the meadow. It is bare of all vegetation, save a few clumps of willow and of alder, just beginning...
Page 7 - I neglect to fulfill the intentions which I shall now record, this page may have the effect of bringing me back to the path of improvement, I here declare that I have been too remiss in taking notes, neglecting to set down things of importance from sheer laziness, and that I will reform in this particular.
Page 22 - ... to end the ever-varying and orderly display and close it with her snowy pall. All have, without substantial interference, exhibited their beauty to mankind, performed their offices of love to animals, to insects and each other, and have matured their seeds and provided for the perpetuation of their kinds. And so it is with our fields and forests. First outburst from the teeming earth, amid the leafless trees, the modest spring beauty, the sweet Mayflower, the white and blue hepaticas ; and when...
Page 28 - The rude axe, with heaved stroke, Will ne'er be heard ; " but the dead will repose in solemn quietude and safety. There is, too, in the lawn above us, the rich fields and waving woods, a variety which can never stale, and Taste has full scope to gratify Affection's every wish. I cannot assert that more beautiful grounds have nowhere been devoted to such sacred purposes ; but will you not justify me in saying that there could not be, in the vicinity of Buffalo, a more appropriate and precious offering...
Page 27 - ... the Cabinet of President Buchanan could not divert him. Judge Clinton was the founder of the Society of Natural Sciences in Buffalo, and lectured frequently upon geology and botany; and the last study was his special consolation and delight. Had there been in Buffalo, as in the English Universities, the office of a public orator, Judge Clinton would have worn its laurel, so constant and so various were his addresses upon all occasions of public interest and ceremony. In 1856, he was elected a...
Page 22 - ... number. Analogy would lead me one step farther, namely: — that all animals and plants have descended from the same one prototype." Now, as this theory would permit God as creator, it is really unnecessary. To infinite power, it was equally easy to create one prototype, whether animal or vegetable, or of an intermediate nature, and enable it to vary into all the forms of life, whether past or present, from the simple conferva to the oak, the apple and the palm ; and from the monad to man ; or...
Page 14 - ... hard for you to raise any memorial stone for your graves, which shall outlast this great, unselfish labor of Judge Clinton, or be more likely to transmit your names to the grateful remembrance of those who shall come after you. I have asked the question, did we, while he was with us, fully appreciate how greatly we were favored in the fact that he was our fellow-townsman...
Page 15 - Society, lie said : It will bring together in its collections all the plants and animals of the surrounding country, all its shells, insects, fishes, birds, beasts and animated things. It will collect and bring together all our minerals and specimens of everything that can show or illustrate the geology of that territory. It will arrange all its collections in the most perfect order for the inspection of an enlightened curiosity and for the uses of the student of nature. It will originate and maintain...

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