An Address Delivered as the Introduction to the Franklin Lectures, in Boston, November 14, 1831

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Gray and Bowen, 1832 - Boston (Mass.) - 24 pages
 

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Page 9 - ... which constitute the check. Mr. Cartwright made no reply to this observation at the time ; but some weeks after, on receiving a second visit from the same person, he had the pleasure of showing him a piece of muslin of the description mentioned, beautifully executed by machinery. The man is said to have been so much astonished, that he roundly declared his conviction that some agency more than human must have been called in.
Page 21 - Under the same roof which covers his workshop, he has the most excellent library of English books, for its size, with which I am acquainted. The books have been selected with a good judgment, which would do credit to the most accomplished scholar, and have been imported from England by himself. What is more important than having the books, their proprietor is well acquainted with their contents. Among them are several volumes of the most costly and magnificent engravings. Connected with his library...
Page 23 - There is no way, by which knowledge can be handed down, but by being learned over again ; and of all the science, art and skill in the world, so much only will survive when those who possess it are gone, as shall be acquired by the succeeding generation.
Page 24 - ... will gain in the glorious patrimony. When the rich man is called from the possession of his treasures, he divides them as he will among his children and heirs. But an equal Providence deals not so with the living treasures of the mind. There are children just growing up in the bosom of obscurity, in town and in Country, who have inherited nothing but poverty and health, who will, in a few years, be striving in...
Page 20 - I may venture to adduce an instance, nearer home, of the most praiseworthy and successful cultivation of useful knowledge, on the part of an individual, without education, busily employed in mechanical industry. I have the pleasure to be acquainted, in one of the neighboring towns, with a person, who was brought up to the trade of a leather-dresser, and has all his life worked, and still works, at this business. He has devoted his leisure hours, and a portion of his honorable earnings, to the cultivation...
Page 24 - ... contention with the great intellects of the land. Our system of free schools has opened a straight way from the threshold of every abode, however humble, in the village or in the city, to the high places of usefulness, influence and honor. And it is left for each...
Page 17 - He passes his days in his office, giving advice to clients, often about the most uninteresting and paltry details 16 of private business, or in arguing over the same kind of business in court...
Page 9 - Some time after he had brought his first loom to perfection, a manufacturer, who had called upon him to see it at work, after expressing his admiration of the ingenuity displayed in it, remarked that, wonderful as was Mr. Cartwright's mechanical skill, there was one thing that would effectually baffle him...
Page 14 - It is these which make the man, which are the man. I do not say that opportunities, that wealth, leisure, and great advantages for education, are nothing : but I do say...
Page 8 - The warp was placed perpendicularly, the reed fell with a force of at least half a hundred weight, and the springs which threw the shuttle were strong enough to have thrown a Congreve rocket. In short, it required the strength of two powerful men to work the machine at a slow rate, and only for a short time.

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