An Address Delivered at Lenox, on the First of August 1842, the Anniversary of Emancipation in the British West Indies

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John Green, 1842 - Slavery - 32 pages
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Page 15 - Tranquillity pervaded the towns and country. A Sabbath indeed ! when the wicked ceased from troubling, and the weary were at rest, and the slave was...
Page 14 - ... of thanksgiving, and praise, and blessing, and honor, and glory, to God, who had come down for their deliverance. In such exercises the evening was spent until the hour of twelve approached. The missionary then proposed that when the clock on the cathedral should begin to strike, the...
Page 15 - The planters informed us that they went to the chapels where their own people were assembled, greeted them, shook hands with them, and exchanged most hearty good wishes...
Page 15 - ... in broken Negro dialect, of gratitude to God. " After this gush of excitement had spent itself, and the congregation became calm, the religious exercises were resumed, and the remainder of the night was occupied in singing and prayer, in reading the Bible, and in addresses from the missionaries, explaining the nature of the freedom just received, and exhorting the free people to be industrious, steady, obedient to the laws, and to show themselves in all things worthy of the high boon which God...
Page 24 - Spirit in the day of Pentecost. He came in the destruction of Jerusalem, which, by subverting the old ritual law and breaking the power of the worst enemies of his religion, insured to it new victories. He came in the reformation of the Church. He came on this day four years ago, when, through his religion, eight hundred thousand men were raised from the lowest degradation to the rights, and dignity, and fellowship of men.
Page 27 - America by saying that this institution is not ours, that the foot of the slave never pressed our soil ; but we cannot fly from the shame or guilt of the institution as long as we give it any support. Most unhappily, there are provisions of the Constitution binding us to give it support. Let us resolve to free ourselves from these. Let us say to the South, " We shall use no force to subvert your slavery ; neither will we use it to uphold the evil." Let no temptations, no love of gain, seduce us to...
Page 10 - I need nothing but the most general view of slavery, to move my indignation towards it. I am more and more accustomed to throw out of sight its particular evils, its details of wrong and suffering, and to see in it simply an institution which deprives men of freedom ; and when I thus view it, I am taught immediately, by an unerring instinct, that slavery is an intolerable wrong. Nature cries aloud for freedom as our proper good, our birthright and our end, and resents nothing so much as its loss....
Page 24 - ... the Christian system, and the vast social changes which they involve, have not, until the present day, been dreamed of. All the doctrines of Christianity are more and more seen to be bonds of close, spiritual, reverential union between man and man ; and this is the most cheering view of our time. Christianity is a revelation of the infinite, universal, parental love of God towards his human family...
Page 32 - Mighty powers are at work in the world. Who can stay them ? God's word has gone forth, and "it cannot return to him void." A new comprehension of the Christian spirit, — a new reverence for humanity, a new feeling of brotherhood, and of all men's relation to the common Father, — this is among the signs of our times. We see it ; do we not feel it ? Before this all oppressions are to fall. Society, silently pervaded by this, is to change its aspect of universal warfare for peace. The power of selfishness,...
Page 32 - There is one point on which your moral influence may be exerted with immediate effect. Should a slave-hunter ever profane these mountainous retreats by seeking here a flying bondman, regard him as a legalized robber. Oppose no force to him ; you need not do it. Your contempt and indignation will be enough to disarm the " man-stealer" of the unholy power conferred on him by unrighteous laws. I began this subject in hope, and in hope I end. I have turned aside to speak of the great stain on our country...

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